Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The Visual History of Fedora

Filed under
Linux

With the release of Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn happening in just a matter of days, last month at Phoronix we had presented The Visual History of Ubuntu. In that article we went back and looked at all Ubuntu releases to date to see how it has evolved over time both when it comes to the interface as well as the changes that had made up each release. Today we are doing the same for Fedora as we look back upon its history.

Fedora began as Fedora Core, which was sponsored by Red Hat and was (and still is) developed largely by the community. Unlike Ubuntu that is including a variety of binary blobs, Fedora contains only free and open-source software. It is derived from Red Hat and is commonly referred to as a bleeding edge version or the testing grounds for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. However, like Ubuntu, new Fedora releases are generally pushed out about every six months and often falls into a schedule similar to Ubuntu. Due to the integration of Fedora Core and Fedora Extras with version 7, the Linux distribution will be properly known as Fedora.

The versions we will be looking at today are Fedora Core 1 "Yarrow", Fedora Core 2 "Tettnang", Fedora Core 3 "Heidelberg", Fedora Core 4 "Stentz", Fedora Core 5 "Bordeaux", Fedora Core 6 "Zod", and Fedora 7 Test 3.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

7 Unikernel Projects to Take On Docker in 2015

Docker and Linux container technologies dominate headlines today as a powerful, easy way to package applications, especially as cloud computing becomes more mainstream. While still a work-in-progress, they offer a simple, clean and lean way to distribute application workloads. With enthusiasm continuing to grow for container innovations, a related technology called unikernels is also beginning to attract attention. Known also for their ability to cleanly separate functionality at the component level, unikernels are developing a variety of new approaches to deploy cloud services. Read more

GNOME 3.16 SDK Runtime Now Available

Following last week's release of GNOME 3.16, the initial builds of the GNOME SDK Runtime are now available for those wishing to experiment with their new fully-sandboxed Linux app tech and other new app runtime abilities. Read more

SBC runs Linux on new quad-core Cortex-A9 SoC

Actions Technology released a quad-core Cortex-A9 “S500″ SoC, along with an “ActDuino S500″ SBC based on it, plus support for Android 5.0 and Linux. Read more

Reglue at LibrePlanet

  • LibrePlanet & the Sounds of Silence
    My sponsor for attending LibrePlanet was John Sullivan, the executive director of the Free Software Foundation, and I was surprised that he took the time to get me shown around. I wanted to kiddingly say to John, “Hey, you got people to do this, right?” I didn’t because I was afraid the humor would not have translated well…and I’m not sure it did here either.
  • Have You Decided Yet?
    On March 21st of this year, the Free Software Foundation presented our organization Reglue with the Award for Projects of Social Benefit. We share that announcement link with Sébastien Jodogne for being given the Award for the Advancement of Free Software. We're specifically thankful that people like Sean "NZ17" Robinson spearheaded this nomination campaign and got us into the running.