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The Visual History of Fedora

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Linux

With the release of Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn happening in just a matter of days, last month at Phoronix we had presented The Visual History of Ubuntu. In that article we went back and looked at all Ubuntu releases to date to see how it has evolved over time both when it comes to the interface as well as the changes that had made up each release. Today we are doing the same for Fedora as we look back upon its history.

Fedora began as Fedora Core, which was sponsored by Red Hat and was (and still is) developed largely by the community. Unlike Ubuntu that is including a variety of binary blobs, Fedora contains only free and open-source software. It is derived from Red Hat and is commonly referred to as a bleeding edge version or the testing grounds for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. However, like Ubuntu, new Fedora releases are generally pushed out about every six months and often falls into a schedule similar to Ubuntu. Due to the integration of Fedora Core and Fedora Extras with version 7, the Linux distribution will be properly known as Fedora.

The versions we will be looking at today are Fedora Core 1 "Yarrow", Fedora Core 2 "Tettnang", Fedora Core 3 "Heidelberg", Fedora Core 4 "Stentz", Fedora Core 5 "Bordeaux", Fedora Core 6 "Zod", and Fedora 7 Test 3.

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