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Annual Kaspersky Labs Fearmongering!

Merry Fearmongering!

Kaspersky Labs (maker of the infamous KAV for Windows), has started what I call their "annual fearmongering initiative".

It appears about this time of year, when they release their so-called "Look everyone! We found a proof of concept malware that does something nasty to *insert opensource solution name here*" press releases.

Obviously, this is designed to spread fear.
(If you know what you're doing in Linux, there's nothing to fear.)

Here's a friendly reminder...

This is from 2006.

The case of the non-viral virus

Torvalds creates patch for cross-platform virus virus debunked by experts

And for this year? (2007)

iPod virus scare stories are here
(It involves Linux installed on iPod).

Notice how in BOTH cases:

(1) The malware in question are "proof of concept" ones!
Translation? They do NOTHING in real life! They don't spread by themselves. They do NOT do any widespread damage!

(2) They don't do anything until you run them with root privilages and the like. As in you intentionally or delibrately infect yourself! No one is THAT stupid!

(3) Kaspersky Labs were the only ones that happen to find this type of malware! It leads me to believe it is THEM who are delibrately writing this proof of concept nonsense to begin with!

(4) It involves opensource solutions.

While these tactics may work on the Windows crowd, don't expect the Linux crowd to fall for the same BS. Its not gonna work.

Let me end this post by suggesting you read this article.
(If you've read it before, I want you to remind yourself again this year.)

Can the malware industry be trusted?

My response to Kaspersky...
Do you really think we're that stupid?

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