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Linux No Longer Means Linux

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Linux

  • Microsoft launches new open-source project to bring Linux tool eBPF to Windows [Ed: Microsoft loves Linux... when it helps sell Windows or bring code to Windows]

    Microsoft has launched a new project which has the aim of bringing Linux kernel tool eBPF (Extended Berkeley Packet Filter) to Windows.

    The company insists that the move to get the technology working in Windows does not represent creating a fork of eBPF. Instead, it will use existing projects, including the IOVisor uBPF project and the PREVAIL verifier, to run eBPF programs and APIs on top of its own operating systems -- specifically Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016 or above.

  • Microsoft Bringing eBPF Support To Windows

    eBPF has been one of the greatest Linux kernel innovations of the past decade and now Microsoft has decided to bring this "revolutionary technology" to Windows Server and Windows 10.

  • Open Source API Gateway KrakenD Becomes Linux Foundation Project [Ed: Overt openwashing (mis)using the name "Linux"]

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it is hosting the Lura Project, formerly the KrakenD open source project. Lura is a framework for building Application Programming Interfaces (API) Gateways that goes beyond simple reverse proxy, functioning as an aggregator for many microservices and is a declarative tool for creating endpoints.

  • Open source API gateway KrakenD lands at the Linux Foundation

    KrakenD will continue to exist as it is today, but it’s now donating its core framework/library to the Linux Foundation — what will be known as the Lura Project. Its core mission is to offer an “extendable, simple, and stateless high-performance API gateway framework,” either for on-premises or cloud deployments, according to Lombarte.

  • What’s up with… OneWeb, NGMN + Linux Foundation, Delta Fiber

    The Linux Foundation and the Next Generation Mobile Network Alliance (NGMN) are teaming up to collaborate on efforts related to “5G and beyond.” NGMN says its new strategy, which places “a particular focus on Mastering the Route to Disaggregation, Sustainability and Green Future Networks, as well as on 6G and the continuous support of 5G’s full implementation,” is “complementary to the efforts of the Linux Foundation’s LF Networking and LF Edge umbrella projects, as well as others like LF Energy operating within the telecom, IoT, and networking spaces.” The duo note in this announcement that particular areas of collaboration will likely include “sustainability, network automation and network autonomy based on Artificial Intelligence, security, edge cloud, virtualization, disaggregation, cloud native, and service-based architecture” and more. So, quite a lot to talk about then!

  • Linux to work with NGMN on priorities for 5G and 6G mobile [Ed: Very gross abuse of the term "End to End" and brand "Linux". Linux Foundation is, at this point, killing "Linux" as a brand by overusing it and rendering it rather meaningless.]

    The Next Generation Mobile Network Alliance (NGMN), which represents operators and vendors, has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Linux Foundation for formal collaboration regarding end-to-end 5G and beyond.
    Anita Döhler (pictured), CEO of the NGMN Alliance, said: “open source is gaining increasing relevance for the strategic topics of our work programmes — such as mastering the route to disaggregation, green future networks and 6G. We are delighted to partner with the Linux Foundation to jointly drive our mission for the benefit of the global ecosystem.”

Entrapment (Microsoft)

EEE

  • Microsoft embraces Linux kernel's eBPF super-tool, extends it for Windows

    Microsoft on Monday launched an open source project to make a Linux kernel tool known as eBPF, short for Extended Berkeley Packet Filter, work on Windows.

    Inspired by network packet filtering and capture software dubbed Berkeley Packet Filter, eBPF is a register-based virtual machine designed to run custom 64-bit RISC-like architecture via just-in-time compilation inside the Linux kernel. As such, eBPF programs are particularly well-situated for debugging and system analysis, such as tracing file system and registry calls.

One more...

EEE promoted by Microsoft boosters

Openwash

  • KrakenD API Gateway for Microservices Becomes Linux Foundation 'Lura' Project

    The team behind the KrakenD stateless, distributed, high-performance API gateway that enables microservices adoption, announced this week that the Linux Foundation will host the continued development of the gateway under a new name: the Lura Project.

    KrakenD was created five years ago as a library for engineers to create fast and reliable API gateways. It has been in production among a range of Internet companies since 2016.

KrakenD

  • KrakenD joins the Linux Foundation as the Lura Project

    According to the foundation, Lura is a framework for building API gateways. It acts as an aggregator for microservices and is a declarative tool for creating endpoints.

    “By being hosted at the Linux Foundation, the Lura Project will extend the legacy of the KrakenD open source framework and be better poised to support its massive adoption among more than one million servers every month,” said Albert Lombarte, CEO of KrakenD. “The Foundation’s open governance model will accelerate development and community support for this amazing success.”

KrakenD API Gateway Joins the Linux Foundation as the Lura...

  • KrakenD API Gateway Joins the Linux Foundation as the Lura Project

    The Lura Project, the open source framework formerly known as KrakenD, has joined the Linux Foundation where, according to a press statement, “it will be the only enterprise-grade API Gateway hosted in a neutral, open forum.”

    The project is now active on more than one million servers per month, said Albert Lombarte, co-founder and CEO of KrakenD API Gateway. The move to the Linux Foundation put the technology first, rather than the needs of the enterprise company built on top of it.

NGMN

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel: Paul E. Mc Kenney and New Stuff in Linux

  • Paul E. Mc Kenney: TL;DR: Memory-Model Recommendations for Rusting the Linux Kernel

    These recommendations assume that the initial Linux-kernel targets for Rust developers are device drivers that do not have unusual performance and scalability requirements, meaning that wrappering of small C-language functions is tolerable. (Please note that most device drivers fit into this category.) It also assumes that the main goal is to reduce memory-safety bugs, although other bugs might be addressed as well. Or, Murphy being Murphy, created as well. But that is a risk in all software development, not just Rust in the Linux kernel. Those interested in getting Rust into Linux-kernel device drivers sooner rather than later should look at the short-term recommendations, while those interested in extending Rust's (and, for that matter, C's) concurrency capabilities might be more interested in the long-term recommendations.

  • Verification Challenges

    You would like to do some formal verification of C code? Or you would like a challenge for your formal-verification tool? Either way, here you go!

  • Cluster Scheduler Support Queued Ahead Of Linux 5.16 - Phoronix

    Cluster scheduler support has been queued up for landing in the Linux 5.16 kernel for AArch64 and x86_64 systems for improving the CPU scheduler behavior for systems that have clusters of CPU cores. The cluster scheduler support in this context is about enhancing the Linux kernel's scheduler for systems where sets of CPU cores share an L2 cache or other mid-level caches/resources. This cluster scheduler work stems from work by HiSilicon and Huawei aiming to improve the Linux performance for the Kunpeng 920 server chip. That HiSilicon SoC has six or eight clusters per NUMA node with four CPU cores per cluster and a shared L3 cache. With the cluster scheduler patches they were able to enhance the overall performance of the system and also improve the efficiency.

  • AMD Finally Enabling PSR By Default For Newer Hardware With Linux 5.16 - Phoronix

    With it getting late into the Linux 5.15 kernel cycle, the focus is shifting by the Direct Rendering Driver maintainers from new feature work targeting the next cycle (5.16) to instead on bug fixes. AMD sent out a pull request of new AMDGPU Linux 5.16 material this week that is primarily delivering bug fixes but one notable addition is finally enabling PSR by default for newer GPUs.

  • Intel Compute-Runtime 21.41.21220 Ships Updated DG1 Support - Phoronix

    Intel's open-source engineers have shipped Compute-Runtime 21.41.21220 as the newest version of this Linux compute stack enabling OpenCL and Level Zero support with their graphics processors. Intel Compute-Runtime 21.41.21220 is the latest weekly update for this compute stack. New this week is updated DG1 platform support and Level Zero support for SPIR-V static module linking.

OpenSSH, Squid, PostgreSQL Update in Tumbleweed

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released this week have brought updates for text editors, browsers, emails clients, database management systems and many other pieces of software. Mozilla Firefox, Thunderbird, nano, and PostgreSQL were all in the latest 20211012 snapshot. A new major version of Firefox 93.0 added support for the optimised image format AVIF, which offers a significant file size reduction as opposed to other image formats. The browser also improved web compatibility for privacy protections and fixed more than a handful of Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. Thunderbird 91.2.0 addressed many of the same CVEs, fixed some issues with the calendar and fixed the new mail notifications that did not properly take subfolders into account. The 5.9 version of text editor nano added syntax highlighting for YAML files and fetchmail 6.4.22 added a few patches, addressed a CVE related to an IMAP connections and now highlights being compatible with OpenSSL 1.1.1 and 3.0.0. The new major version of postgresql 14 provided improvements for heavy workloads, enhanced distributed workloads and added a couple more predefined roles like pg_read_all_data, pg_write_all_data and pg_database_owner. Other packages to update in the snapshot were GNOME’s document viewer evince 41.2, Flatpak 1.12.1, graphics library gegl 0.4.32, glusterfs 9.3 and many RubyGems and YaST package updates. Read more Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the weeks 2021/40 & 41

Games: Dystopian Army Builder, Hellraid DLC, and More

  • Uh oh, looks like Despot's Game: Dystopian Army Builder is going to suck all my time away | GamingOnLinux

    Despot's Game: Dystopian Army Builder is a brand new release from Konfa Games and tinybuild that sees you command a bunch of naked people and send them through a strange post-apocalyptic labyrinth. Note: personal purchase. Like it Loop Hero, you have no direct control during combat you just watch it play out and hope for the best. Here though you're running through some kind of maze-like dungeon full of strange machines, with multiple people you need to look after. They'll likely die a lot though, don't get too attached, you can buy more naked people. Eventually you might come across the nefarious d’Spot who runs the show and perhaps destroy them to earn your freedom. It blends together quite a few different genres and it feels totally unique. The structure is a bit like The Binding of Isaac with you going from room to room, it's also a strategy game with you buying people and equipping them with various weapons you buy from shops spread throughout the maze and then there's the fusion of auto battling so you can sit back and watch the mess unfold.

  • Techland continue expanding the Hellraid DLC as they try to improve reviews | GamingOnLinux

    When Techland released the Hellraid DLC in August 2020 inspired by their unreleased dark fantasy slasher Hellraid the reviews were not kind, as it was very basic but they've kept at it and another big update is out now.

  • Brawlhalla to get Easy Anti-Cheat, dev puts up Beta with EAC working on Linux with Proton | GamingOnLinux

    Blue Mammoth Games announced that later in October that the platform-fighter Brawlhalla will be getting Easy Anti-Cheat. Thankfully, they've put up a Beta for Linux users playing it on Steam Play Proton and it works.

  • Apple is now funding Blender development joining many big names | GamingOnLinux

    There's apparently absolutely no stopping the Blender train, with the developer announcing that Apple has now joined their development fund.

  • Valve banning games that allow exchanging cryptocurrencies or NFTs | GamingOnLinux

    It seems Valve aren't a big fan of cryptocurrencies or NFTs as they've updated their onboarding guide with a new point about disallowing games that allow you to exchange them. Under the Rules and Guidelines heading where it mentions "What you shouldn’t publish on Steam" there's a new line that states "Applications built on blockchain technology that issue or allow exchange of cryptocurrencies or NFTs".

  • Check out this crowdfunding campaign to learn Godot Engine from GDQuest | GamingOnLinux

    GDQuest, a well-known name in the free and open source Godot Engine land has launched a new crowdfunding campaign aiming to get you to go from zero to hero with Godot programming. A course aimed at anyone and everyone who fancies getting into making games with Godot. The founder of GDQuest, Nathan Lovato, emailed in a little info about it: " Learn to Code From Zero is a course for everyone who wants to learn development. With it, you will learn programming from the very basics to creating a complete video game inspired by the hectic action game Enter the Gungeon. Game development courses typically consist of hours of step-by-step tutorials. They feel nice while you follow along, but as soon as you're left alone, working on your game, you get stuck.

LibreOffice Leftovers

  • Michael Meeks/2021-10-15 Friday

    After Italo's keynote announcement of the new LibreOffice Technology marketing plan at the LibreOffice conference, we lost no time integrating this great way to fairly present the goodness of LibreOffice that we depend on to build Collabora Online & Collabora Office mobile into the product. With new links that can take you to our LibreOffice Technology page where we can celebrate the community & credit all the hard work done under the hood here, and of course the logo. Still a work-in-progress, and will start to appear in our products over the next weeks as/when we refresh them, but so far it looks like this for desktop & mobile [...] up-coming COOL About dialog up-coming COOL About dialog Thanks to Italo & Mike at TDF for developing the concept, and also to Pedro & Elisa, for their work on the code & logos - we'll be iterating it with them over the next days & weeks.

  • Let's do awesome things! Get support for your projects and ideas from our budget - The Document Foundation Blog

    Want to organise a local (or online) LibreOffice event? Need some merchandise to boost your project or community? Then we can help you! The Document Foundation, the non-profit behind LibreOffice, is backed by contributions from ecosystem members and volunteers, as well as donations from end-users. This helps us to maintain TDF, but we can do a lot more too. And next year, we want to do a lot of projects again!

  • Next batch of videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2021 - The Document Foundation Blog

    Here are some more videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2021! Check out the playlist, using the button in the top-right – or scroll down for links to individual videos...

  • Automated bibisect to find source of a bug - LibreOffice Development Blog

    In programming, we usually face bugs that we should fix to maintain or improve our software. In order to fix a bug, first we should find the source of the problem, and there are tools like “Automated bibisect” are available to help, specially when the bug is a regression.