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Debian Just Died

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Linux

Sam Hocevar was elected the new DPL: Debian Project Leader Election 2007 Results.

It's useless to ask "how many voted for Sam", because the Debian elections are using an advanced Condorcet voting system with Schwartz Sequential Dropping, to guarantee that the winner is the candidate that is the less hated, if I am allowed to put it this way.

More Here.

re: Debian Just Died

Seems unlikely. They've existed for years with poor leadership, petty infighting, and lack of direction - why would a new figurehead change things so radically that the distro would die?

It's unlikely that businesses will change their opinion on Debian, in most cases, no corporate sponsorship for that distro keep most businesses away (i.e. they were a unfocused unfunded unmanaged distro before, and they still are - so where's the big change?).

As to Shuttleworth worrying - after pouring in truckloads of his own money, I would guess there's been plenty of "what if" discussions on that very topic (i.e. Debian's demise). It's doubtful that Ubuntu's "plan B" would be "well that's it folks, lets fold up shop".

I'm with stupid, round two

Also interestingly ranted by Beranger: How Do You Want Your Devices To Be Called Today?

Have you tried Etch?

I know there are a lot of users of other distros here, but have any of you tried Etch? It's quite good. It's highly configurable with lots of choices. I don't recommend it for the newbie, but the more experienced user can make what he wants of it. The lack of non-free multimedia items is an easy workaround if that's what you need.

And regarding the title "Debian Just Died", as Patrick Swayze said in movie Road House, "Opinions differ". I hope that the Debian developers keep up all that infighting and bickering and wandering around direction-less, because whatever they are doing sure produces a great distro.

re: Etch

Darkman wrote:
as Patrick Swayze said in movie Road House, "Opinions differ"

Wow, I'm not sure I know of anyone in real life that would admit to watching a Swayze movie, let alone be able to quote from it!

As to Etch, yeah, it's a pretty good distro. Apt, Network Install, total control over the install and config, what's not to like (oh yeah, that little picky thing called dependencies and poor repository control). For personal use, no worries, but when you attempt to bring something into a business, where the infrastructure can impact the bottom line, flakiness of the core development team and it's perceived lack of leadership or management does become a concern.

re: tried Etch?

Darkman wrote:

I know there are a lot of users of other distros here, but have any of you tried Etch? It's quite good. It's highly configurable with lots of choices. I don't recommend it for the newbie, but the more experienced user can make what he wants of it. The lack of non-free multimedia items is an easy workaround if that's what you need.

I've been using it on this website's server for several weeks to a month now. I've been fairly pleased overall. I'm quite pleased with what seems to be better performance and memory handling, but on the other hand I'm a bit bummed out by the three kernel opps I've had. But I've been running etch from a March 5 or so snapshot. I'm gonna dist-update including the newest kernel shortly. I hope I won't have any further problems.

As far as configurability, I don't find it as flexible as say slackware. Debian has its own way of doing some things, which was one of the motivating factors in leaving Gentoo. Gentoo was real bad about having its own weird way of doing things which made customizing or using prior knowledge more difficult. It's not as bad in Debian, but it's still there. So, sometimes I'm forced to look for the "debian" documentation as opposed to generic Linux or individual application docs.

UPDATE: Make that 4 kernel opps!

You say tomato I say tumahtoe

srlinuxx wrote:
UPDATE: Make that 4 kernel opps!

I think your opps went oops! (thank gfranken for turning me into a spelling nazi).

You should give CentOS a try, we have great luck with them running 24/7/365 with nary a hiccup.

re: You say tomato I say tumahtoe

lolol. yep, I guess so. Blushing

Well, I'm gonna do a dist-upgrade and see if that helps. There is a new bigmem kernel in stable now. But I might try CentOS if this keeps oops'in on me. Big Grin

Disclaimer

My penchant for mostly correct spelling and grammar (no one is perfect) does not an any way mean that I am a spelling nazi--it merely indicates that I enjoy correcting vonskippy Smile

It's Debian testing for me

I've used Debian testing since the end of January, which, now that Etch is done, should be getting a whole lot of packages coming in from unstable. It should be interesting. (Before that, I used Kanotix, a slightly modified version of Debian unstable, which I couldn't have done without help from Kanotix's support forums. Unstable does break from time to time.)

If you've ever run into "dependency hell" with an rpm-based distro, you'll find Debian's package management system to be a breath of fresh air, and there's a huge pool of software to choose from. You rarely run into problems if you stay within the pool. Debian does sometimes have its own way of configuring things, though.

The one thing Debian is deficient in is "newbie support," if you will. One seems to be expected to read the man pages and figure things out on one's own. (But for beginners, there's always Ubuntu.)

Debian Just Died

Like many readers I am not that up to date on the infighting of Debian's politics, but to say that Sam will be the end of Debian is absurd (how many said that about Mandrake/Mandriva when Gael left). I thought Beranger was above this kind of thing Sad

I was introduced to Debian through Ubuntu and now I have Debian Etch (while still in testing) running E17 and I have no problems with it. Granted it does not have the bling bling of other distro's and it takes about 2-3 years for a release, but I don't mind. If I want bleeding edge then I can always install Sidux or if I want to be one of the in-crowd I can go back to Ubuntu.

Isn't that the beauty of Linux, choice!

Ah well, I suppose Beranger is entitled to his opinion, but this does smack me of either petty jealousy or sour grapes.

re: debian comments

EmyrB wrote:
or if I want to be one of the in-crowd I can go back to Ubuntu.

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha....

Oh, you weren't kidding - never mind.

Debian Just Died

> but this does smack me of either petty jealousy or sour grapes.

Can you define jealousy under the circumstances, please? Jealous ON WHAT?! I didn't run for the DPL Smile

Sour grapes?! In which way?! I can install Debian whenever I want. But I just don't want anymore.

Debian Died not because it will not run anymore. They might never release another stable, yet testing will be usable. Debian died as a distro you can trust. How could anyone trust Debian as an enterprise-grade distro, when the developers have elected as DPL a guy that creates kindergarten-like mutiny? C'mon.

re: debian

Béranger wrote:
>How could anyone trust Debian as an enterprise-grade distro

I think that's been a problem for them long before this recent leadership choice.

I know of several IT Shops that moved off of Debian after the IceWeasel nonsense showed that Debian, like their logo, is spiraling out of control.

What're you talking about?

Why, exactly, are you so upset about the choice of Sam Hocevar as the DPL?

Vous aimez faire grand bruit, non?

(And what the hell does Debian's changing the names/logos of Mozilla products to Iceweasel, Icedove, and Iceape have to do with its suitability as a server?)

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