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This Week's KDE Commit-Digest

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KDE
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This week in the KDE Commit-Digest we find some really nice goodies. Of course there are plenty of the less glamorous but quite necessary commits as well. All together, things are proceding along at an exciting pace.

First up Bluetooth support was added to the KDE Solid api stack, as well as KMobileTools being ported to KDE4. It was mentioned that "breadcrumb navigation widget from Dolphin is made more modular to allow use in other KDE contexts."

Konsole has been updated to allow for more customization of the text cursor. Better file transfer support is now seen for the AIM protocol in Kopete. And "KWord gets the ability (through Kross scripting) to use an OpenOffice.org instance to import from supported file formats."

Kpackage is being ported to Smart package management. This sounds exciting. I personally can't wait to test that.

okular, a pdf viewer based on kpdf, is being brought back into main and Kremas, another image viewer, was imported into KDE svn for testing. kiriki, a dice game based on Yatzee, was put in kdereview.


Kiriki, Yatzee-like fun for KDE 4



There was very little individual blogging on the kdelibs "hackathon" (three day library weekend), but this week's Commit-Digest tells us how busy those KDE beavers were. Adriaan de Groot is quoted as reporting, "a little over 1800 commits" were made. That brought the total weekly number to 2837.

Some highlights include:

  • work by david (and some help by thiago) means that kdecore now links to 18 less libs! That's in-half folks.

  • stephan kulow brought in a new libloader which combined with a final fix to kdebug means no UI deps in kdecore

  • josef spillner merged khotnewstuff2 into kdelibs

Well, that's the high points folks. For all the details see this week's KDE Commit-Digest.

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