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OpenSUSE vs Ubuntu

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SUSE
Ubuntu

I have used Ubuntu for almost 2 years and was completely in love with Ubuntu. One fine day my UPS gave up and my root file system was corrupted. It clearly means a re-install. Now that I have used OpenSUSE for 2 months, here is a brief comparison between my experiences with Ubuntu and OpenSUSE.

Installation: Lets begin with the very beginning. I used instLinux for installing both of them. On Ubuntu it took me just 5-6 hours to get a shiny Gnome desktop. On OpenSUSE it took me 48 hours. I had to first install in text mode, ran into installation breakage, did some hacking to get a new root password and finally installed Gnome. Sometimes I feel, that if I did not had an alternate working thinkpad with Arch Linux, I would have quit halfway and installed Ubuntu.
Advantage :: Ubuntu

The initial Grub Screen: Ubuntu has a black brown screen, on the other hand SUSE has a bluish screen. Added to that sometimes SUSE displays a super cool Penguin themed grub boot screen. Now I know that is this nothing big and we can configure any boot screen, but on OpenSUSE it comes as default.
Advantage :: OpenSUSE

Full Story.

openSUSE beats Ubuntu?

you must be kiddin me! ubuntu is the greatest distro in the WORLD! did novell pay to say that? *sarcasm*

Ubuntu is the greatest

Ubuntu is the greatest distro in the world in Your opinion. Everyone is entitled to one... And yes, OpenSUSE could become better than Ubuntu, but it' s very unlikely.
And i consider the best distro in the world to be... Mandriva! Smile

re: Ubuntu is the greatest

Gawd, I'd hate to have to state which is the absolute greatest.

re: Ubuntu is the greatest

c'mon, it was an obvious satire! i freakin hate ubuntu! lmao

re: OpenSuse vs Ubuntu

The article lost me at:

"Fedora was too sluggish".

Also his rant about OpenSuse taking 48 hours to install? Huh? I downloaded the DVD, installed it, played around a bit, decided I didn't like YAST or the KDE manglement (not that they're bad - just a personal preference), uninstalled it, all in about 4 hours.

re: OpenSuse vs Ubuntu

coming from a former ubuntu user, it probably took him some time to figure out what "choice" means! never underestimate the culture-shock element

Zero out of ten for each

When I tried to install SuSE (just before the name change), I also found it extremely time-wasting. There were so many issues. Two, in particular, I just could not fix and I got thoroughly sick of the exercise. I'm never going through that again.

The first time I tried Ubuntu, I had to perform all kinds of witchcraft to get it to display properly on a monitor that has been happy to display another 7 or 8 distros. The second time, with X*, the installer recognised none of the Linux partitions until I removed the empty ones, after which, it refused to create a new partition in the unused space.

A plague on both their houses.

Windows expert, Linux newbie

Windows expert, Linux newbie (relatively speaking).
I have tried numerous distros, including Linspire, PCLinuxos 2007 etc, and so far (maybe because I'm Windows-centric) I'd have to say for simple ease of use, openSUSE 10.2 is easily the winner.

I've been able to configure it easily, add to it easily and have it work extremely reliably on a 1Ghz Athlon. I selected the KDE desktop as always and hey - this thing works. The previous reference to "48 hours to install" baffles me completely.

FInally for anyone wanting a very fast and simple Linux running from cd - check out Puppy Linux. Sounds more like a toy, but I assure you it is not.

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