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Quick Little Tour of Opera's New Speed Dial

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Opera 9.2 was released this morning to a surprizing amount of interest. I suppose one of the reasons for all this excitement is the new feature called Speed Dial. Speed Dial isn't exactly as we've come to understand the term, but is more like a bookmark page with thumbnails.

Although in description it might not sound that exciting, it is really nice looking. The reload time is adjustable, so you can really get a thumbnail of what new content may be on your favorite sites - if you have young eyes. To my old eyes, I'm afraid reloading won't make much difference.

However it has some nice easy configurations. When you first start up your new Opera 9.2, the first page that opens is a blank tab with the Speed Dial template waiting. The first thing I noticed was a thumbnail being presented with a mouse-over any open tabs. This may not be a new feature, but it was to me (and my failing memory).

As you click to add a web page, a dialog box opens with some of your latest web history entries to choose from, or you can input a web address.

But what of pages that require one to be logged in to show personalized content such as or

Well, simply open another tab and log in. Then click reload in the right-click menu of the Speed Dial thumbnail or wait for it to reload itself (if enabled). Notice that now my customzied Yahoo page is given in the screenshot below.

And the thumbnails are easily rearrangable (is that a word?). Just click, drag and drop the thumbnail to the desired position. To delete a thumbnail, just simply right-click and choose "clear" or click on the faint circled X in the upper right corner of the thumbnail's frame.

I was hard-pressed to find nine sites I'd like to visually bookmark these days. I'm afraid I'm a product of the RSS feed craze. However if you are not like me, once you are done setting it all up, look what a nice looking start screen you could have. Simply click on a thumbnail to open the represented webpage or use Ctrl+n (where n=the number of the thumbnail in your array). It's really is a nice feature. Opera just keeps getting better and better.

i've tried it out

pretty cool i must say, i can get used to it easily, and what's with the widgets, how long has that been there?! opera needs to add a better bookmarks manager though, then firefox is history

re: widgets

I think since an early beta of 9.0. I've got a story on it somewhere. ...where did I put that stor... Oh ok, here it is.


after 3 hours of surfing the web with opera, i've gotta say i'm stunned! other than speed dial bookmarks and widgets, it has thumbnail tab preview, irc client, mail & news reader, a great layout and a pretty good settings manager, i know firefox can be customized to do all that, but by the time i add all of these plugins it'll be slower than vista on a p3 machine.

its only downside is still the bookmarks manager, maybe it's just me, because i literally have hundreds of bookmarks, i don't know, just a thought, if only its developers would pay more attention to this area, but i'll difinetly be keeping an eye on this project from now on.

but i'll keep using galeon Tongue

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