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A week with Windows

Filed under
Linux

As a GNU/Linux user and developer I rarely get to see how the other half lives. That is, Windows users. So, during my week off work, I had two goals: complete the recording of a music project I’d been working on, and finish as many outstanding (non-Linux-centric) projects as possible... using only Windows. I managed the first without too many problems (now to find a record deal Wink but had some issues on the second. This entry documents those problems, and the lessons to be learnt from it. I’m writing this part as therapy, and part talking point, in the hope someone will comment and explain why these things are the way they are.

My first task was getting Windows installed on the desktop. I’d got a disc (legitimate, too!) of Windows 2000 and thought that it’d be up-to-date enough for my needs. Alas no. The on-board network card is not recognized by W2K. No problem, I’ll just logon to the Microsoft site and download... Oh... Wait... Perhaps I’ll use the Windows laptop to grab some_random_driver.zip from their server. I tried and failed. As did the installation CD I’d been given with the motherboard. Various random, seemingly unrelated, error boxes appeared with cryptic messages so I gave up, found a PCI network card, and installed that instead. Perfect! (I later used it to find updated drivers for the on-board network card, but still no joy.) Rhetorical note to self: never install or configure a machine without a second machine with Internet access. Borrow a laptop if necessary.

The next task was to format a partition.

Full Story.

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