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China's Internet Users Top 100 Million

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China's population of Internet users has surpassed 100 million, the government said Tuesday.

China already has the world's second-largest population of people online after the United States, which has 135 million.

The latest Chinese figure was announced by Xi Guohua, an official with the Ministry of Information Industry, according to the official Xinhua News Agency.

Last week, China's government threatened to shut down Web sites that fail to register with regulators in a new campaign to tighten controls on what the public can see online.

China's communist government promotes Internet use for education and business but also tries to block its public from seeing material deemed pornographic or subversive.

Authorities also are trying to tighten controls on what children can see online.

Associated Press

Bad comparison

I'm not sure looking at those numbers in that way reflects the true ranking. China might have 100 million Internet users, but they also have 1300 million people. America has 135 million Internet users with a population of 300 million. I'd say China has a long way to go to match that ratio (1/13 for China compared with 1/3 for the US). An even better number to compare then the ratio is how many of those Internet connections are un-censored? Who cares how many Internet users China has if all it's information if filtered by the government?

re: Bad comparison

>Who cares how many Internet users China has if all it's information if filtered by the government?

Not sure, but I think that's the point.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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