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Celestia Brings Space Exploration To Your Desktop

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Software

Celestia is a free software package that graphically simulates celestial objects ranging from the earth and our solar system to distant constellations and galaxies.

Simulating motions, light and shadow in three dimensions, the program generates amazing 3D images and allows the user to travel to any place in the universe and visit planets, comets, and other objects in the solar system.

The program is licensed under GPL and versions are available for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X.

Bit More Here.

Celestia Homepage.

Celestia Screenshots.

i love celestia

it's like google earth of space, you can visit any solar system you want, any star you want and even some of the non-solar system planets out there, just brilliant!

and by the way srlinuxx, i'm waiting for your openSUSE 10.3 alpha3 review =)

re: i love celestia

Yeah, the screenshots looked awesome.

Quote:

and by the way srlinuxx, i'm waiting for your openSUSE 10.3 alpha3 review

I'm working on it right now. I won't finish it before bedtime, so it'll probably be tomorrow after work before I can finish it and post it.

The Changelog and rpmlist are up now tho.

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