Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Xandros Desktop Pro

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

With an interface that is quite similar to classic Windows, along with utilities that target Windows migrations, Xandros Desktop Professional is a good choice for a productivity desktop and can rival more popular distributions, although bugged from design inconsistencies and a strict licensing structure.

If you have used other Linux distributions like Ubuntu or OpenSuSE, when booting up Xandros Desktop Professional for the first time, you can’t help but feel unimpressed by the overall packaging of the product - everything looks a bit dated, from the choice of the default wallpaper, up to the window decorations used within the K Desktop Environment. But don’t let this initial impression get to you. Once you tweak up the working environment, Xandros Desktop Professional can be an enjoyable OS to work on.

I’ve installed Xandros Desktop Professional on a BenQ Joybook laptop sporting an AMD Turion64 CPU along with 512MB of RAM, which is pretty much high above the requirements of Linux desktop distributions. The installation took around 1.4GB of hard drive space, which is pretty normal nowadays, but with Xandros, you get a mix of free software, open source software, and proprietary software in one installation. With a retail price of USD $99 (Boxed and Download editions), the package is ideal for people looking for a good transitional distribution and still have a requirement to run Windows applications via Codeweaver’s CrossOver Office. The boxed package contains 2 CDs, the Installation CD, which includes the Xandros Desktop core software, and the Applications CD, which is a collection of free and non-free software that you might require, along with the printed User Guide and a 30 minute SkypeOut coupon. The download package does not have the SkypeOut promotion (but I maybe wrong, but then, the software being reviewed was given for free, so I’m not complaining) and the User Guides can be downloaded as PDFs.

Full Story.

Where Are the Snap-Ins?

The upcoming product release from Xandros helps Windows System Administrators feel more at home in an increasingly Linux-based infrastructure.

Called Xandros BridgeWays, the product runs on a Windows or Linux workstation and enables admins to manage multiple Linux/UNIX machines via an MMC-like console. The console additionally supports the integration of Windows components (including Active Directory), and the individual servers being managed--collectively called the Managed Community--can interact with one another (through a central server) in such a way that they are aware of one another's installed configurations and running services. So if Server A's configuration is changed and Server B is reliant on Server A, an alert will be generated asking the admin to address Server B as well. Watch for Xandros BridgeWays to become available in the late May/early June time frame, and follow the link below to our new product briefing with more details.

More Here.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Linuxwashing and Research Openwashing

today's howtos

Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more

Graphics: Intel and Mesa 18.1 RC1 Released

  • Intel 2018Q1 Graphics Stack Recipe
    Last week Intel's Open-Source Technology Center released their latest quarterly "graphics stack recipe" for the Linux desktop. The Intel Graphics Stack Recipe is the company's recommended configuration for an optimal and supported open-source graphics driver experience for their Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics found on Intel processors.
  • Mesa 18.1-RC1 Released With The Latest Open-Source 3D Driver Features
    Seemingly flying under our radar is that Mesa 18.1 has already been branched and the first release candidate issued. While the Mesa website hasn't yet been updated for the 18.1 details, Dylan Baker appears to be the release manager for the 18.1 series -- the second quarter of 2018 release stream.