Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

AMD Hauls Intel Back to Court

Filed under
Legal

Opening a new round of hostilities in one of Silicon Valley's longest-running legal feuds, Advanced Micro Devices on June 27 filed suit against chip giant Intel for a series of alleged antitrust violations AMD says are aimed at crippling the smaller chipmaker.

n a sharply worded 48-page complaint, AMD claims that Intel has engaged in an aggressive, global campaign to shut out or severely limit AMD's participation in the microprocessor market. The methods Intel has used, according to the complaint, include hundreds of millions of dollars in rebates, discounts, and marketing funds to drive computer makers, distributors, and retailers into exclusive or near-exclusive deals with Intel.

In one case, AMD says Toshiba stopped using AMD chips in 2001 because doing business with the chipmaker would "jeopardize Intel market development funds estimated to be worth $25 million to $30 million per quarter." In 2002, Hewlett-Packard said it would be willing to use AMD chips only if AMD paid the computer maker $25 million each quarter to compensate for the expected retaliation from Intel, the suit contends.

Intel also applied intense personal pressure on executives who contemplated breaking ranks, AMD alleges. The complaint says Craig Barrett, Intel's former chief executive and now chairman, flew to Taiwan in September, 2003, when he heard that Acer was planning to publicly support the launch of a new AMD chip for laptop and desktop computers. He allegedly told Acer's chairman and CEO that the company would suffer "severe consequences" if it participated in AMD's launch. Ultimately, Acer withdrew from the publicity events.

AMD is seeking unspecified damages in the suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Delaware. But the Sunnyvale (Calif.) chipmaker says financial payments are much less important than forcing Intel to stop its monopolistic practices. AMD contends that Intel's behavior has resulted in higher PC prices, fewer choices, and a decline in innovation.

"It has become clear that the industry needs us to do this," says Hector Ruiz, AMD chief executive. "Around the world people will be happy we're putting this on the table. They may not come out and say it. But there's no doubt in my mind."

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

Red Hat Financial News

Wine 2.0 RC6 released