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Ubuntu and Endless OS: 'Finservs', Ubuntu in the Wild, and Endless OS Foundation

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Ubuntu

  • Finserv open source infrastructure powers digital transformation

    Covid-19 pandemic has presented unprecedented challenges and opportunities for financial institutions to embrace digital transformation initiatives at pace and scale. Finservs are enhancing their purview of digital transformation initiatives to stay relevant and create a technology foundation that enables them to quickly bounce back from future contingencies.

    Finserv digital transformation is spurred by technology, and the leading technologies spurring digital transformation are open source. It is fair to say that open source technologies are playing a key role in digital transformation.

    Financial institutions require a comprehensive portfolio of digital infrastructure and interconnection choices, both physical and virtual, and a wide range of cloud, and SaaS options to deliver that change.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Ubuntu in the wild – 06th of July

    The Ubuntu in the wild blog post ropes in the latest highlights about Ubuntu and Canonical around the world on a bi-weekly basis. It is a summary of all the things that made us feel proud to be part of this journey. What do you think of it?

  • How your organisation’s equipment policy can impact the environment

    At the Endless OS Foundation, we’ve recently been updating some of our internal policies. One of these is our equipment policy, covering things like what laptops and peripherals are provided to employees. While updating it, we took the opportunity to think about the environmental impact it would have, and how we could reduce that impact compared to standard or template equipment policies.

    How this matters

    For many software organisations, the environmental impact of hardware purchasing for employees is probably at most the third-biggest contributor to the organisation’s overall impact, behind carbon emissions from energy usage (in building and providing software to a large number of users), and emissions from transport (both in sending employees to conferences, and in people’s daily commute to and from work). These both likely contribute tens of tonnes of emissions per year for a small/medium sized organisation (as a very rough approximation, since all organisations are different). The lifecycle emissions from a modern laptop are in the region of 300kgCO2e, and one target for per-person emissions is around 2.2tCO2e/year by 2030.