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Server Leftovers

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Server
  • DHCP Server Conflict Detection

    This blog title should really be, “Why you always, always, always want conflict detection turned on on all the networks MAAS touches,” but that’s really long as a title. But hear me out.

    As promised, here is another DHCP blog, this time explaining how you can have multiple DHCP servers on the same subnet, serving overlapping IP addresses. There are a lot of network-savvy folks who will tell you that serving the same set of IP addresses from two different DHCP servers just won’t work. While that’s a really good rule to follow, it isn’t totally accurate under all conditions.

  • DHCP scope

    It’s possible to have more than one DHCP server on the same network and still have everything work right, with no conflicts and no dropped packets or IP requests. It’s really not that hard to pull together, either, but there are some things to know, and some things to consider before we investigate that situation. For this blog, we’ll put some of the overlooked facets of DHCP in bold text. Let’s take a look.

  • LXD - Container Manager

    I recently started working for InfluxData as a Developer Advocate on Telegraf, an open source server agent to collect metrics. Telegraf builds from source to ship as a single Go binary. The latest - 1.19.1 was released just yesterday.
    Part of my job involves helping users by reproducing reported issues, and assisting developers by testing their pull requests. It’s fun stuff, I love it. Telegraf has an extensive set of plugins which supports gathering, aggregating & processing metrics, and sending the results to other systems.
    Telegraf has a huge set of plugins, and there’s super-diverse ways our users deploy Telegraf, sometimes I have to stand up one-off environments to reproduce reported issues. So I thought I’d write up the basics of what I do, partly for me, and partly for my co-workers who also sometimes need to do this.
    My personal and work computers both run Kubuntu 21.04. Sometimes issues are reported against Telegraf on other Linux distributions, or LTS releases of Ubuntu. In the past I’d use either VirtualBox or QEMU to create entire Virtual Machines for each Linux distribution or product I’m working with. Both can be slow to stand up clean machines, and take a fair chunk of disk space.
    These days I prefer to use LXD. LXD is a system container manager, whose development is funded and led by Canonical, my previous employer. It’s super lightweight, easy to use and fast to setup. So it’s the tool I reach for most for these use cases.
    Note that LXD can also launch Virtual Machines but I tend not to use that feature, preferring lightweight containers.

    [...]

    I’ve been a big fan of LXD for some years now. I’ve found it a super fast, reliable way for me to spin up lightweight machines running random Linux distributions, and throw them away when done. It helps keep all those random and unstable pieces of software I’m testing nicely compartmentalised, and easy to nuke.

  • Pentagon kills Microsoft’s $10B JEDI cloud contract, says tech is now outdated | Ars Technica

    Amazon's legal stall tactics seem to have paid off.

More in Tux Machines

Software: Matrix, Ktube, and Monero P2Pool

  • Chat Bubbles on Element and Several Matrix Apps

    This simple comparison wants to help everyone adopt alternative messaging technology, Matrix, with suitable user interface to them. We call Matrix Apps to instant messengers like Element, Fluffy, Nheko, Schildi and Spectral as they are created based upon the said technology. We will start by setting up criteria first that includes chat bubbles, then going through these messengers one by one, and you will see their pictures here along with a little comments from me. I hope you can pick up the messenger with UI you love the most from here.

  • Ktube Media Downloader lets you download YouTube videos easily on Linux

    I always like to tell people about how I have been using Linux as my primary operating system for over ten years. I love Linux, I understand it, it’s free and above all, it fits my workflow in a way Microsoft’s Windows (with all its goodness) probably never will. That also means I love and am a command-line ninja but I also know one thing, a lot of people out there fear and hate the command line.

  • Monero P2Pool V1.0 Is Released

    The latest version of P2Pool, a decentralized Monero mining pool has released. This is the first official release, signaling an invitation for more users to try out the new software.

Better Support & Performance For OpenACC Kernels Is Coming To GCC

While the GNU Compiler Collection has supported OpenACC for a few years now as this parallel programming standard popular with GPUs/accelerators, the current implementation has been found to be inadequate for many real-world HPC workloads leveraging OpenACC. Fortunately, Siemens has been working to improve GCC's OpenACC kernels support. GCC's existing OpenACC kernels construct has been found to be "unable to cope with many language constructs found in real HPC codes which generally leads to very bad performance." Fortunately, improvements are on the way and could potentially be mainlined in time for next year's GCC 12 stable release. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Database containing 106m Thailand travelers' details leaked • The Register

    A database containing personal information on 106 million international travelers to Thailand was exposed to the public internet this year, a Brit biz claimed this week. Bob Diachenko, head of cybersecurity research at product-comparison website Comparitech, said the Elasticsearch data store contained visitors' full names, passport numbers, arrival dates, visa types, residency status, and more. It was indexed by search engine Censys on August 20, and spotted by Diachenko two days later. There were no credentials in the database, which is said to have held records dating back a decade. “There are many people who would prefer their travel history and residency status not be publicized, so for them there are obvious privacy issues,” wrote Comparitech editor Paul Bischoff on the company’s blog.

  • Break out your emergency change process and patch this ransomware-friendly bug ASAP, says VMware

    VMware has disclosed a critical bug in its flagship vSphere and vCenter products and urged users to drop everything and patch it. The virtualization giant also offered a workaround.

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 185 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 185. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Mattia Rizzolo ]
    * Fix the autopkgtest in order to fix testing migration: the androguard
      Python module is not in the python3-androguard Debian package
    * Ignore a warning in the tests from the h5py package that doesn't concern
      diffoscope.
    
    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Bump Standards-Version to 4.6.0.
    

GNOME 41 Released. This is What's New.

GNOME team announced the release of GNOME 41 with some exceptional changes and updates. We wrap up the release in this post. Read more