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100% Microsoft Free

Yes
55% (287 votes)
No
45% (231 votes)
Total votes: 518

I wish . . .

My home desktop is 100% Linux but I need to dual boot to XP because I collaborate on a newsletter that, unfortunately, is composed in Publisher.

At work, again, my desktop is 100% Linux, but I need to run an XP box as a server for a video application that does not support Linux, and will not run under Wine. I find myself using that box for Excel Spreadsheets because it is much faster than OO Calc. I could use Gnumeric, but it does not support macro recording! I guess you can write a script/macro, but that is beyond my interest or capability.

Bottom line: It's getting closer by the second. A few more application generations and I can hopefully kiss MS goodbye.

no...

no im not but i am currently running Feisty Fawn and i love it and i do have a question and that would be, how do i format my HDD its a 80 GB WD and im only running from CD and when i install it, it dosent it allow me to it says that i have to partition my HDD so what do i format it as any suggestions and when i install Feisty Fawn to my HDD im planning on having another 80 GB HDD as a slave would that have to be hooked up as well or not?

thakns

and i do own a X-Box (will their ever a linux gaming system hmm something to think about) Dell PC with XP Media Center, and on my X-Box i do have linux x-box but ive yet to really use it (oops)
.::.Chris.::.

email me at chris.francis.3829@gmail.com please thakns again

There's tons of documentation on Ubuntu's website

Additionally, you might want to format/partition your hard drive before installing Ubuntu, in order to decide just how you want it done. For that, take a look at the GParted live CD. (Like Ubuntu, you boot from it; it's very small -- less than 50 MB; and it's very handy to have around.)

If you're new to installing Linux, consider spending some money on a book about Ubuntu. Since a new version just came out, they'll be about the older version, but it's doubtful the installation process has changed much. For example, Beginning Ubuntu Linux: From Novice to Professional will lead you through the entire installation process.

You probably do want to have your slave drive hooked up when you install Ubuntu. Otherwise, you'll probably have to add it to /etc/fstab manually.

re: no

Darkstar3829 wrote:
i do have a question and that would be..

Repeat after me: "Google is my Friend".

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=ubuntu%2Bpartition&btnG=Search

Free of Microsoft! since two years ago

Hi,

I have two Desktops, and one laptop.
The laptop runs Ubuntu Dapper Drake
One Desktop is dual boot Ubuntu Feisty and Fedora Core 6
second Desktop runs Debian Etch stable.

My server runs CentOS 4.4 (thinking on an upgrade to CentOS 5.0)

re: No MS software

I never had to use ndiswrapper because I don't use wireless but ndiswrapper should be ok as long as the driver isn't taken directly from a windows xp CD and as long as the author of the driver doesn't specifically say something like "for use only on windows xp."

No MS software here too

Only Linux here. And I don't use any w32codecs or MS ttf fonts on Linux like some other folks.

re: No MS software

Quote:

I don't use any w32codecs or MS ttf fonts on Linux like some other folks.

oops, does that count? Big Grin

re: No MS software

srlinuxx, actually yes it does. Wink
In fact, mplayer illegally redisdtributes the w32 codecs and the real player ones.

re: No MS software

welp, I reckon I've never been microsoft free then. ...especially if my ms keyboard also counts. Big Grin ...and also ndiswrapping the windows drivers for the wireless nic in that laptop.

dang, I just can't get away from them.

...Except for my IR remote.

Spent AUD$47 last year (for MS MCE USB remote). This is my only contribution to Microsoft since Win2k and MS Office 97.

Everything else has been MS free.
(No Xbox, Zune, Joysticks, mice, keyboards, etc).

ALL my boxes use either Linux or BSD.
(Arch Linux, Debian, FreeBSD and OpenBSD).

NO Windows, MS Office, Visual C++/C#, etc.

I've even removed Windows off my ThinkPad...Even the "Designed for Windows" sticker! (Looks so much better when you remove ALL those damn stickers!)...And yes, I got powersaving features and ThinkPad buttons working fully. Big Grin

Windows free, yes; M$ free, no

I own a XBox, a Sidewinder game pad, and a wireless keyboard and mouse set. Plus there are some M$ programs on my Macs.

Yes

In this particular historical moment, I ban Microsoft on my PC and I install only free/open software if I can.
When the free/open software will be established I'll install Microsoft packages on my linux/BSD system.

MS Free--You bet.

At home, yes--I'm 100% Windows Free. Four computers, all Linux, all the time.

I have an unopened box of windows XP Pro sitting on a bookshelf--it was given to me last summer at a teacher computer science training workshop by a Microsoft Rep. I have not been visited by any temptation to install it.

None of my computer peripherals are MS products either.

No Windows Free For Me

My primary desktop computer and laptop both run Linux, but all my other PCs run Windows XP/Vista.

microsoft free

Servers - all Linux (starting around 2001).
Desktops - all WinXP (although most of them run Linux as a Guest OS under VM - plus a handful of laptops that either run Linux only or dual boot).

Not sure what we'll do in 2008 when Microsoft forces the move to Vista by not selling WinXP OEM anymore. Hopefully by then, Vista won't suck.

windows free

I was, until I got a laptop for christmas with windows on it.

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