Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

  • How to Create Audiobooks Using Python – Linux Hint

    As you might already know, Python is a wonderful programming tool because it allows us to do virtually anything! This also means that we can create our own software. In this tutorial, we will learn to synthesize speech, get Python to read pdfs, even translate them for us, and then read them to us.

    What we’re going to do here is to get Python to read us a pdf, and translate it for us. First, we’ll try to create an English audiobook. As such, the first thing we must logically do is to extract the text from the pdf. For this, we use the module known as tika. As usual, to install Tika, one conjures pip.

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.29 Scheduled To 3

    After a lot of discussion, Andrew Shitov has announced the schedule of the first ever Raku Conference (online on 6, 7 and 8 August 2021). Yes, you read that right: 3 days! One track per day.

  • Nibble Stew: A quick look at the O3DE game engine and building it with Meson

    Earlier today I livestreamed what it would take to build a small part of the recently open sourced O3DE game engine. The attempt did not get very far, so here is a followup. It should not be considered exhaustive in any way, it is literally just me poking the code for a few hours and writing down what was discovered.

  • Use GDB Print Stack Trace of Core File

    If you have been programming for a while, you have come across the term core dump.
    If you look at the core man page, it defines as core dump as “a file containing an image of the process’s memory at the time of termination. This image can be used in a debugger (e.g.) gdb to inspect the state of the program at the time that it terminated”.

    In simple terms, a core dump file is a file that contains memory information about a process when the specific process terminates.

    There are various reasons why processes may crash and create a core dump file. This tutorial will show you how to use GDB to view the core dump file and print the stack trace.

  • Calling getpid function in C with Examples – Linux Hint

    Getpid() is the function used to get the process ID of the process that calls that function. The PID for the initial process is 1, and then each new process is assigned a new Id. It is a simple approach to getting the PID. This function only helps you in getting the unique processes ids.

    Functions used in getting ids

    Two types of IDs are present here. One is the current id of the process PID. Whereas the other is the id of the parent process PPID. Both these functions are built-in functions that are defined in library. While running the code without using this library may cause an error and stops executing.

  • C String Concatenation – Linux Hint

    Concatenation is the process to append second string to the end of first string. In this article we are going to discuss how to concatenate strings in C by using different methods.

    The standard C library function which is used to concatenate string is strcat().

  • Quick Sort in Java Explained

    Quick Sort, also written as Quicksort, is a list sorting scheme that uses the divide-and-conquer paradigm. There are different schemes for Quick Sort, all using the divide-and-conquer paradigm. Before explaining Quick Sort, the reader must know the convention for halving a list or sub-list and the median of three values.

    [...]

    What about the case, when the number of elements in the list or sub-list is odd? At the start, the length is still divided by 2. By convention, the number of elements in the first half of this division is length / 2 + 1/2. Index counting begins from zero. The middle index is given by length / 2 – 1/2. This is considered as the middle term, by convention. For example, if the number of elements in a list is 5, then the middle index is 2 = 5/2 – 1/2. And, there are three elements in the first half of the list and two elements in the second half. The middle element of the whole list is the third element at index, 2, which is the middle index because index counting begins from 0.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Esports and More

  • The Dramatic Rise of Esports Worldwide

    The Boiling Steam Matrix Room is full of surprises. Turns out that one of our readers, @Grazen, is in a senior leadership role at an Esports company. Since Esports are growing like crazy these days, it was a great opportunity to ask him for more details about the market and where everything is headed (and if Linux fits anywhere currently). [...] Adam: I play all of them, badly, but I keep trying. I would say Overwatch is my favorite to play but tough to master. Overwatch and League of Legends also work well via Lutris in Linux so it makes it easier for me to play as I don’t generally use Windows or OSX. There’s of course a native Linux version of Counter-Strike but I don’t believe it’s as well optimized as the Windows version. Call of Duty isn’t playable on Linux due to the anti-cheat system used.

  • Assistive Tech And Video Games | Hackaday

    The basic premise of the circuit is pretty simple. She DIY’d a few contact switches using conductive plates made of cardboard, duct tape, and aluminum foil. The output of the switch is read by analog input pins on an Arduino Leonardo. When the switches are off, the analog input pins are pulled HIGH using 1 MegaOhm resistors. But when the user hits their head on one of the four conductive pads, the switch is engaged, and the analog input pins are shorted to ground.

  • How to install Grapple! by Barji on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Grapple! by Barji on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below. This tutorial will only work on Chromebooks with an Intel or AMD CPU (with Linux Apps Support) and not those with an ARM64 architecture CPU.

5 Best Terminal Based Linux Monitoring Tools

We are going to explore the 5 best terminal based monitoring tools that you can use on your Linux systems to keep you fully aware of their status. Everyone will agree that Linux monitoring tools are required to ensure a healthy Linux infrastructure. Hence, a performance monitoring solution becomes important to observe the health, activities, and capability of your Linux systems. Fortunately, there are many Linux monitoring tools available out there. In this article we are going to talk about 5 lightweight terminal-based and free-to-use tools to monitors servers and desktops running Linux. Read more

‘Video Trimmer’ GTK App Adds Dark Mode, New Encode Option

Among the changes offered in Video Trimmer 0.7.0 is a new checkbox for “accurate trimming with re-encoding” to the output file selection dialog. Whenever you need a frame-perfect result you may want to make use of this option — though it can sometimes result in lower quality, so YMMV. As well as more accurate trimming, the look of the app has been given a once-over. The design of Video Trimmer is said to better match the GNOME Adwaita theme, and the app now sports a dark style/dark mode (and uses this by default, in-keeping with other editing tools). Finally, the app makes finding your exports a touch easier. When video trimming is complete the app shows a(n in-app) notification. As of this release that notification gains a “Show in Files” button. This lets you quickly locate the resulting clip. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, FLOSS Weekly, Freespire 8.0

  • Reptilian Power Play | Coder Radio 443

    We peak in on one of the nastiest corporate moves in a while, and Chris has a big confession.

  • FLOSS Weekly 659: Open Source and Amateur Radio - Steve Stroh

    Steve Stroh (N8GNJ) joins Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett (KG5IAR) for an hour of conversation regarding the world of wireless communication, HAM radio and open source. It's quite the masterclass as he discusses how HAM radio modeled and still practices openness for the world, packet radio, TNCs, SDRs (and transceivers) WSJT, Helium, LoRa, the ups and downs of crypto, WSPRnet, CHIRP, disaster recovery, making antennas, StarLink, mesh networks and much more.

  • Freespire 8.0 Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at Freespire 8.0.

  • Freespire 8.0

    Today we are looking at Freespire 8.0. It is based on Ubuntu 20.04, Linux Kernel 5.4, XFCE 4.16, and uses about 900MB - 1.5GB of ram when idling.