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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • CSS: Avoid horizontal scrolling

    If you had told me last year that I’d write not one, but two blog posts about web design, I would not have believed you. Alas here we are, and I’m going to tell you about another pet peeve of mine and how to fix it.

    I view at least half the written content I consume via my mobile phone, which belongs to the class of phones with a slightly smaller than average screen. In fact, it’s width as reported by the Firefox and Chrome viewport simulators is 375 pixels wide, small but not tiny. And yet many websites I visit hinder my mobile viewing experience because of a rather simple issue: horizontal scrolling.

    There I am, happily reading a blog post or article from the front page of $NEWSAGGREGATOR. But suddenly I’m not scrolling down, but down-right and constantly have to scroll back to the left edge in order to read full sentences. My experience is even worse if the site for some reason has a minimum width larger than my screen is wide.

    Reading articles on those sites really cumbersome and more often than not I decide that it’s not worth the hassle to continue reading and move on to the next article. I find that quite sad, since the author invested time and effort to produce it, and the only reason I’m not reading is because of its subpar layouting.

  • Configure Postfix as a Send-Only SMTP Server on Ubuntu 20.04

    Postfix is an open-source Mail Transport Agent (MTA). An MTA is a component of the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) responsible for transferring mail from one mail server to another.

    This tutorial describes how you can install and configure Postfix as a send-only SMTP server on Ubuntu 20.04. You can use this for sending notification emails to an external address when specific events occur on the server -- such as when a backup job succeeds or fails.

  • Get a list of all virtual hosts which are defined in all apache configuration files

    Have you ever looked in the apache config files to see where a website's virtual host is defined? The apache2ctl script has a useful option that could come in good here.

  • Command line quick tips: wc, sort, sed and tr - Fedora Magazine

    Linux distributions are great to use and they have some tricks under their sleeves which users may not be aware of. Let’s have a look at some command line utilities which really come in handy when you’re the guy that likes to stick with the terminal rather than using a GUI.

    We all know that using a terminal is more efficient to use the system. In case you are editing or playing with text files on a terminal then these tools will surely make your life easy.

    For this article let’s have a look at wc, sort, tr, and sed commands.

  • How to recover deleted Logical volume (LV) in LVM

    If you have accidentally removed a logical volume (LV) or LVM meta data got corrupted or damaged in some way, it can be easily restored without losing the data using the ‘vgcfgrestore’ command.

    In this guide, we’ll show you how to restore accidentally deleted a logical volume in Linux.

    By default, LVM automatically takes backup of it’s meta data whenever a configuration change occurs on all LVM devices using the ‘vgcfgbackup’ command.

  • How to use cron on Linux | Opensource.com

    The cron system is a method to automatically run commands on a schedule. A scheduled job is called a cronjob, and it’s created in a file called a crontab. It’s the easiest and oldest way for a computer user to automate their computer.

  • OpenSSH ssh-agent Shielded Private Key Extraction (x86_64 Linux)

    While most of you guys were furiously grep-ing TermService memory for clear-text passwords I found myself searching for plain-text private keys in a ssh-agent process memory on a Linux box. Last time I did something similar was definitely before June 2019, when Shielded Private Keys were introduced in OpenSSH, therefore the tools I have available don’t work anymore.

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