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Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Linux Mint 20.2 “Uma” Xfce, and a Look at InfinityBook

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  • LHS Episode #421: YOTA Camp Deep Dive | Linux in the Ham Shack

    Hello and welcome to Episode 421 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts interview Neil Rapp, WB2VPG, coordinator of the IARU Region 2 YOTA camp and Peter Lafreniere, N8JPL, one of the youth participants. The topics include an in-depth look at what the campers experienced, events held, challenges faced, and the future of the event. We hope you enjoy this interview and deep and have a great week until the next time we meet.

  • Linux overview | Linux Mint 20.2 “Uma” Xfce

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Linux Mint 20.2 "Xfce" and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Full Review: The new InfinityBook Pro 14 Linux Notebook from Tuxedo Computers

    Tuxedo sent over their InfinityBook Pro 14 Linux notebook to the studio for me to review, and in this video, I'll give you my thoughts. And it very well might have the best screen from any notebook I've ever reviewed.

More in Tux Machines

Vulkan update: version 1.1 conformance for Raspberry Pi 4

  • Vulkan update: version 1.1 conformance for Raspberry Pi 4

    It has been almost a year since we announced conformance for Vulkan 1.0 on Raspberry Pi 4 devices. Since then, we have been working on improving driver performance, expanding the feature set, and advancing towards Vulkan 1.1 support. Today we are excited to announce that Khronos has just granted Vulkan 1.1 conformance to Raspberry Pi 4. All the required driver changes for Vulkan 1.1 have already been merged in the upstream v3dv Mesa driver and will hopefully be available soon in Raspberry Pi OS.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 Granted Official Vulkan 1.1 Conformance - Phoronix

    Last week I mentioned how Mesa landed Vulkan 1.1 support for the V3DV driver most notably used by the Raspberry Pi 4 and newer. With those changes in Mesa Git, The Khronos Group has now officially granted this driver Vulkan 1.1 conformance for the Raspberry Pi 4. It's now official with The Khronos Group signing off on the Vulkan 1.1 conformance test results for the V3DV driver running on the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B single board computer.

  • Vulkan 1.1 conformance achieved for the Raspberry Pi 4 | GamingOnLinux

    Good news for fans of the tiny Raspberry Pi 4 Model B, as it has been announced that the v3dv Mesa driver has hit Vulkan 1.1 conformance officially now. Shared on the Raspberry Pi website, with a post from Igalia’s Iago Toral they mention that it's been almost a year since the driver officially hit Vulkan 1.0 so it's great to see it continue to advance. In the post they noted that all the required changes are already merged in the upstream Mesa project. This means it will be available officially with the next major Mesa release later this year (Mesa 21.3).

NVIDIA 495.44 Graphics Driver Adds GBM Support, Indicator for Resizable BAR Support

NVIDIA 495.44 is a new feature branch version and introduces support for the GBM API, which implements a GBM backend driver that can be used with the GBM loader from the Mesa 21.2 or later. This is good news, especially for KDE Plasma users as the latest 5.23.2 update also adds initial GBM support. Read more

It’s time to boycott AWS

I woke up this morning not planning to write anything on this blog, much less anything about AWS. But then, as I was eating breakfast, I read a horrifying story in Mother Jones about how an AWS employee was treated as he did his best to cope with his wife’s terminal cancer. In the free software community, Amazon (more specifically AWS) has been criticized for years for taking a largely exploitative position concerning FOSS projects. These conversations frequently result in proposals to use licensing as a weapon against AWS. In general, I believe that it would be difficult to target AWS with licensing, as statutory licenses must be fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory. But the issue of exploitation remains: AWS takes from the commons of FOSS projects and productizes that work, frequently without giving anything back. They are, of course, allowed to do this, but at the same time, in doing so, they have frequently undercut the efforts of developers to monetize the labor involved in software maintenance, which leads to projects adopting licenses like SSPL and Commons Clause, which are significantly problematic for the commons. Read more

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