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Kernel: WiFiWart, antiX, Floppy Disk Driver

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Linux
  • WiFiWart Boots Linux, Moves To Next Design Phase | Hackaday

    Over the last few months we’ve been keeping an eye on WiFiWart, an ambitious project to develop a Linux single-board computer (SBC) small enough to fit inside a USB wall charger. Developer [Walker] says the goal is to create an easily concealable “drop box” for penetration testing, giving security researchers a valuable foothold inside a target network from which to preform reconnaissance or launch attacks. Of course, we don’t need to tell Hackaday readers that there’s plenty of other things you can do with such a tiny open hardware Linux SBC.

    Today we’re happy to report that [Walker] has gotten the first version of the board booted into Linux, though as you might expect given a project of this complexity, there were a few bumps along the way. From the single missing resistor that caused U-Boot to throw up an error to the finer points of compiling the kernel for an embedded board, the latest blog post he’s written up about his progress provides fascinating insight into the little gotchas of bringing up a SBC from scratch.

  • antiX Security updated kernels

    Latest security fix kernels should now be in the repos.
    All users are strongly advised to upgrade (via synaptic, cli-aptiX or package-installer).

  • Linux X86 Assembly – How To Make Payload Extraction Easier - Security Boulevard [Ed: Very Linux-hostile site with connections to Microsoft]

    In the last blog post of the X86 Linux assembly series, we focused on how to make our Hello World payload friendly for use as a payload in exploits. However, we didn’t cover how to extract the payload itself for use in exploits. Sure you could view the Objdump output and copy each hex byte out by hand, but that would be tedious and time consuming. Today I want to cover a method for extracting our custom payload from an object file created with GAS using Objcopy.

  • Linux Regressed Its Floppy Disk Driver - Someone Actually Noticed Just A Few Months Later - Phoronix

    It turns out there is actually people running modern versions of the Linux kernel in 2021 that also are using floppy disks.

    There remains a lot of vintage hardware code within the Linux kernel like enthusiasts maintaining the Motorola 68000 series support, among a lot of other older hardware and many drivers for peripherals that haven't been sold new in many years -- including the floppy disk code. But as is often the case, besides it becoming increasingly rare for users of old hardware in general, it's increasingly rare to find vintage computer owners running modern versions of the Linux kernel. But some still do, with the latest example being a regression report over the Linux floppy driver.

More in Tux Machines

Cycles X Merged Into Blender 3.0 With NVIDIA CUDA/OptiX Support, AMD HIP Pending

Cycles X as a modernizing of Blender's Cycles rendering engine has now landed in the latest development code for Blender 3.0. Cycles X brings big performance improvements but does eliminate OpenCL support in the process. Cycles X was one of the reasons for the delay in the Blender 3.0 release to allow time for this Cycles overhaul to land. As of yesterday, the Cycles-X branch was merged into the Blender 3.0 code-base as a major renderer update. Read more

Oracle's Next-Generation GNU Profiler "gprofng" Is Looking Great For Developers

Oracle engineers have been working on "gprofng" as a next-generation GNU Profiler that can analyze production binaries. Oracle talked up Gprofng today during the GNU Tools Track as part of Linux Plumbers Conference 2021. Gprofng stems from Oracle Developer Studio's Performance Analyzer and this new tool currently supports profiling C, C++, Java, and Scala code. Unlike the original gprof, gprofng is able to profile production binaries that do not need to be built with any special options or still have the source code available. Unmodified executable can be easily analyzed and a wealth of information provided. Read more

Software: Host Identity Based Authorization, Baby Buddy, and Foreman

  • Google publishes HIBA, an OpenSSH add-on for certificate-based authorization

    Google has published the source code for the project HIBA (Host Identity Based Authorization) , which proposes the implementation of an additional authorization mechanism for organizing user access via SSH in relation to hosts (checking whether or not access to a particular resource is allowed when authenticating using public keys). Integration with OpenSSH is provided by specifying the HIBA handler in the AuthorizedPrincipalsCommand directive in / etc / ssh / sshd_config. The project code is written in C and is distributed under the BSD license. HIBA uses standard authentication mechanisms based on OpenSSH certificates for flexible and centralized management of user authorization in relation to hosts, but does not require periodic changes to authorized_keys and authorized_users files on the side of the hosts to which it is connected. Instead of storing a list of valid public keys and access conditions in authorized_ files (keys | users), HIBA integrates the host binding information directly into the certificates themselves. In particular, extensions are proposed for host certificates and user certificates, which store host parameters and conditions for granting user access. Host-side verification is initiated by calling the hiba-chk handler specified in the AuthorizedPrincipalsCommand directive. This handler decodes the extensions integrated into the certificates and, based on them, makes a decision to grant or block access. Access rules are defined centrally at the certification authority (CA) level and integrated into certificates at the stage of their generation.

  • Baby Buddy: an Open-source Free newborn digital assistant

    Baby Buddy is a free open-source web-based solution for new parents to help them log, monitor and track their parenting activities. [...] Baby Buddy is a built by Christopher Charbonneau Wells who has released many interesting projects. The project built with Django (Python), and uses several development libraries for front-end development. Note that it is under continues development so expect more features in the near future.

  • Foreman 3.0 crams Puppet ENC into plugin, takes steps towards better UX • DEVCLASS

    Server lifecycle management project Foreman recently saw its third major release, which provides users with a couple of changes that should align the tool somewhat closer with their actual workflow. Amongst the main features of version 3.0 is a still experimental reimagining of the UI’s host detail page. Instead of admins having to click through tabs to get more information about a given host, those details are now readily available on the main host page, along with a central indicator of its status and the usual audit and job data. Users interested in this kind of display can activate the new host page by setting the “Show Experimental Labs” setting in the generic administration settings to yes and selecting “New Details Page” from the host’s dropdown action button. A couple of things — such as the edit button and the menu next to it — still don’t work as intended, and having the option to customise the page would make the new UI even more useful, but it surely is a good first step towards making the page more user-friendly. The Foreman team also promised to get rid of the malfunctions mentioned in version 3.0.1 and asked for additional feedback on the new details page, so users have a good chance of getting their submitted issues fixed quickly if they start testing soon.

Events: LibOCon, POSI, and Kiwi TCMS at WebSummit 2021

  • LibOCon Sponsor Interviews

    LibreOffice Conference 2021, although virtual, could not happen without the support of sponsors, which are – in order of confirmation – the following five companies: Collabora, allotropia, LPI, Omnis Cloud and CarboneIO.

  • Thank You for a Fantastic First POSI!

    We’d like to take a moment to thank our community for making our event on Practical Open Source Information a resounding success -- with more than 300 attendees, 30 speakers, a brilliant keynote address from Heather Leson of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies about the role open source plays in humanitarian efforts, and three tracks, our half-day event proved to be a valuable space for many members of our community to come together and discuss a wide range of pressing issues affecting open source practitioners everywhere. (Recordings of all event talks and panels will be made available shortly!)

  • Meet Kiwi TCMS at WebSummit 2021 in Lisbon

    Kiwi TCMS is happy to announce that our first post-COVID live presence will be at WebSummit 2021, Nov 1-4 in Lisbon, Portugal. We're joining as a featured startup as part of the ALPHA program in category Enterprise Software Solutions. Kiwi TCMS will have an on-site presence during the exhibition (1 day) where you can easily find us. We've also applied to the Startup Showcase track where you can see Alex present on stage. In addition, if all goes well our team will be joined by Alexandre Neto of QCooperative who is leading the effort to adopt Kiwi TCMS for testing the QGIS open source project. More on that here.