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KDE and GTK/GNOME

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  • GSoC 2021 KMyMoney - Post First Evals to Week 7

    I modified the code as suggested by my mentors that were related to coding conventions(according to C++, Qt and KDE).

    After adding the new members to the AlkOnlineQuoteSource constructor. I jumped into writing the unit tests. I realized that I haven’t added the new members in the function signature. After adding that, I build the files to check what all things break related to the constructor’s usage.

  • Peter Hutterer: libinput and hold gestures

    Thanks to the work done by Josè Expòsito, libinput 1.19 will ship with a new type of gesture: Hold Gestures. So far libinput supported swipe (moving multiple fingers in the same direction) and pinch (moving fingers towards each other or away from each other). These gestures are well-known, commonly used, and familiar to most users. For example, GNOME 40 recently has increased its use of touchpad gestures to switch between workspaces, etc. Swipe and pinch gestures require movement, it was not possible (for callers) to detect fingers on the touchpad that don't move.

    This gap is now filled by Hold gestures. These are triggered when a user puts fingers down on the touchpad, without moving the fingers. This allows for some new interactions and we had two specific ones in mind: hold-to-click, a common interaction on older touchscreen interfaces where holding a finger in place eventually triggers the context menu. On a touchpad, a three-finger hold could zoom in, or do dictionary lookups, or kill a kitten. Whatever matches your user interface most, I guess.

    The second interaction was the ability to stop kinetic scrolling. libinput does not actually provide kinetic scrolling, it merely provides the information needed in the client to do it there: specifically, it tells the caller when a finger was lifted off a touchpad at the end of a scroll movement. It's up to the caller (usually: the toolkit) to implement the kinetic scrolling effects. One missing piece was that while libinput provided information about lifting the fingers, it didn't provide information about putting fingers down again later - a common way to stop scrolling on other systems.

  • Christian Hergert: Ignoring GtkTextTag when printing

    Previously, If you wanted to do this, you had to remove all your tags and then print, only to restore them afterwards. This should be a lot more convenient for people writing various GtkSourceView-based text editors. Although, I’m suspect many of them weren’t even doing this correctly to begin with, hence this PSA.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation and Security Leftovers

  • Linux Foundation Offers New DevOps Bootcamp

    The Linux Foundation and Continuous Delivery Foundation are offering a new self-paced DevOps Bootcamp.

  • Open Source Community Shifts Left With OpenSSF, Google SLSA [Ed: Disclosure missing; LF pays them to write these puff pieces]

    Security is becoming an increasingly key piece of the open source puzzle amid industry-wide pushes to shift left and integrate security during early stages of application development. The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) is one example of how the open source community is working to improve software security through an ecosystem approach, vying for proactive handling of security by default.

  • Lead Cloud-Native Security Analytics Engineer Shares Top Tips for Securing the Enterprise

    Cloud and container adoption is on the rise, as organizations are increasingly recognizing the potential for rapid growth and evolution that cloud-based infrastructure offers. That being said, along with these advantages comes significant security challenges. The modern cloud-native attack surface is complex and difficult to secure with many “moving pieces” including endpoints, servers, containers and cloud providers. This makes integrating Threat Intelligence data gathered from all of these surfaces and evaluating potential security and compliance risks and active threats no easy task. Not only is risk harder to identify and evaluate in cloud and container environments, security vulnerabilities, malware and other threats that are also easier to inadvertently inherit from common layers and shared components frequently used in container builds.

  • Released: MITRE ATT&CK v10 - Help Net Security

    MITRE Corporation has released the tenth version of ATT&CK, its globally accessible (and free!) knowledge base of cyber adversary tactics and techniques based on real-world observations. Version ten comes with new Data Source objects, new and changed techniques in its various matrices, key changes to facilitate hunting in ICS environments, and more.

Open Hardware/Modding: AVA 'Big Computing' on ARM, Miniature Computing, and Raspberry Pi

  • AVA Developer Platform offers 32 64-bit Arm cores, 32GB RAM, 10GbE for $5,450 - CNX Software

    The AVA Developer Platform was announced together with ADLink COM-HPC Ampera Altra server module for embedded applications with up to 80 64-bit Arm cores, up to 768GB DDR4, 4x 10GbE, and 64x PCIe Gen4 lanes. The AVA Developer Platform is not fitted with the top-end COM-HPC module, but still, with a 32-core COM-HPC Ampere Altra module fitted with 32 GB DDR4 memory, plus a 128 GB NVMe M.2 SSD, and an Intel Quad X710 10GbE LAN card, it still makes an impressive workstation for native Arm development. We did not know the price the last time, but now we do as the workstation is available for pre-order for $5,450.

  • USB board emulates CR2032 or CR2016 coin cell battery - CNX Software

    You can now develop CR2032 or CR2016 powered devices without having to use an actual coin cell thanks to Peter Misenko’s (Bobricius) “coin cell battery emulator CR2016/CR2032”. The USB board contains a rounded part that is compatible with CR2016 or CR2032 coin cell batteries and allows you to power your target board via USB. The board also includes holes for alligator clips to measure the current, and by extension the power consumption.

  • RPi CM4 based local storage server launches on Kickstarter

    KubeSail has launched a compact, $250 “PiBox” NAS and local clouding hosting server powered by a RPi CM4 with dual native SATA SSD bays for up to 16TB plus GbE, HDMI, 2x USB, 40-pin, and KubeSail software for private clouds. Self-hosting cloud startup KubeSail has gone to Kickstarter to successfully fund its compact network-attached storage (NAS) and storage server called the PiBox. Built around the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 (RPi CM4), the system offers dual, PCIe-driven native SATA bays for 2.5-inch SSDs.

  • Raspberry Pi CM4 based PiBox 2 Mini serves as NAS, private Cloud storage (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    The PiBox 2 Mini is a networked storage solution based on a Raspberry Pi CM4 module and equipped with two slots for 2.5-inch SATA drivers be it HDD’s or SSD’s. It also exposes USB ports and an HDMI port, so I could also be used as a computer. Designed by KubeSail “self hosting company”, the PiBox does not only serve as a standard NAS, but aims to provide a home-based private cloud hosting solution that can replace services such as Google Photos or Dropbox with easily installable templates that are hosted in the box.

  • Surf Sensor Adds Depth To Finding The Ultimate Wave

    o say that the ocean is a dynamic environment would be a gross understatement, especially when coastlines are involved. Waves crash, tides go in and out, and countless variables make even the usual conditions a guessing game. When [foobarbecue] goes surfing, he tries to take into account all of these things. The best waves at his local beach are directly over an ever-moving sand bar, and their dynamics are affected by depth, another constant variable. [foobarbecue]’s brilliant solution to understanding current conditions? Build a depth finder directly into his surf board! At the heart of the “surfsonar” is the Ping Sonar Echosounder, a sonar transducer designed for AUV’s and ROV’s. [foobarbecue] embedded the transducer directly into the board. Data is fed to a Raspberry Pi 4b, which displays depth and confidence (a percentage of how sure it is of the measurement) on a 2.13 inch e-Paper Display Hat.

KDE: PCLinuxOS Update, KDE Connect iOS Enters Public TestFlight Testing, Linux Application Ecosystem 2021 Changsha

  • PCLinuxOS KDE Plasma Update

    The KDE Plasma pkgs were updated to 5.23.2 today. This is a bug fix release update to KDE Plasma 5.

  • KDE Connect iOS Enters Public TestFlight Testing!

    After being picked up again earlier this year, the KDE Connect iOS project is now moving towards public beta testing with TestFlight to collect more user feedback and problem reports as the project inches further towards a full release sometime in the (near?) future.

  • Linux Application Ecosystem 2021 Changsha

    Since I started discussing with Aniqa about organizing some events in China to promote KDE in China in April this year, after half a year of hard work and attempts, I helped KDE Network China and Ubuntu Kylin first event to be successfully held on October 23rd at Central South University. The name of this event is Linux Application Ecosystem Salon, 2021 Changsha marked it as one event in Changsha in 2021. Our goal is to promote the development of FOSS/FLOSS software within Chinese universities and to make it easier for students to understand the development of open source in China nowadays by popularizing KDE software and open-source activities in the other communities.

Kernel: AMX, OpenZFS, and AMDGPU

  • Intel AMX Support Appears Ready For Linux 5.16 - Phoronix

    It's been over one year since Intel disclosed Advanced Matrix Extensions and began posting patches for bringing up AMX support under Linux in anticipation of Xeon Scalable "Sapphire Rapids" processors. While the compiler-side work to GCC and LLVM/Clang has been landing, finally with the forthcoming Linux 5.16 cycle that AMX support appears ready for landing. Merged today to tip/tip.git's "x86/fpu" branch where kernel FPU changes are queued ahead of the next merge window, the last of the AMX enablement patches were queued up. Most notably, the work for actually enabling the AMX feature and being able to expose it to user-space via the new interface.

  • BLK-MQ Support For OpenZFS Pending As Latest Performance Optimization

    A new pull request is pending for implementing multi-queue block (blk-mq) support within OpenZFS' Zvol code, which can lead to sizable performance benefits. Tony Hutter opened up the pull request at the end of last week for blk-mq support. Utilizing blk-mq allows for queuing and submitting I/O requests to block devices simultaneously. With modern multi-core CPUs and speedy storage devices, BLK-MQ can lead to very real benefits.

  • AMDGPU DP 2.0 MST Support Sent In For DRM-Next - Phoronix

    AMDGPU changes already queued up in DRM-Next for Linux 5.16 brought initial code for DisplayPort 2.0 ahead of next-gen GPUs with this connectivity support. Sent out today as a separate pull request is wiring up the DisplayPort 2.0 Multi-Stream Transport (MST) capability for the AMDGPU kernel driver. Sent in as a late topic branch is the AMDGPU DP 2.0 MST support along with a necessary change to the DRM common DisplayPort MST helper code. Multi-Stream Transport allows for multiple independent displays to be driven from a single DisplayPort output, AMDGPU has supported DP MST for DisplayPort 1.x, but additional changes are needed for DP 2.0 compatibility.