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KDE and GTK/GNOME

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  • GSoC 2021 KMyMoney - Post First Evals to Week 7

    I modified the code as suggested by my mentors that were related to coding conventions(according to C++, Qt and KDE).

    After adding the new members to the AlkOnlineQuoteSource constructor. I jumped into writing the unit tests. I realized that I haven’t added the new members in the function signature. After adding that, I build the files to check what all things break related to the constructor’s usage.

  • Peter Hutterer: libinput and hold gestures

    Thanks to the work done by Josè Expòsito, libinput 1.19 will ship with a new type of gesture: Hold Gestures. So far libinput supported swipe (moving multiple fingers in the same direction) and pinch (moving fingers towards each other or away from each other). These gestures are well-known, commonly used, and familiar to most users. For example, GNOME 40 recently has increased its use of touchpad gestures to switch between workspaces, etc. Swipe and pinch gestures require movement, it was not possible (for callers) to detect fingers on the touchpad that don't move.

    This gap is now filled by Hold gestures. These are triggered when a user puts fingers down on the touchpad, without moving the fingers. This allows for some new interactions and we had two specific ones in mind: hold-to-click, a common interaction on older touchscreen interfaces where holding a finger in place eventually triggers the context menu. On a touchpad, a three-finger hold could zoom in, or do dictionary lookups, or kill a kitten. Whatever matches your user interface most, I guess.

    The second interaction was the ability to stop kinetic scrolling. libinput does not actually provide kinetic scrolling, it merely provides the information needed in the client to do it there: specifically, it tells the caller when a finger was lifted off a touchpad at the end of a scroll movement. It's up to the caller (usually: the toolkit) to implement the kinetic scrolling effects. One missing piece was that while libinput provided information about lifting the fingers, it didn't provide information about putting fingers down again later - a common way to stop scrolling on other systems.

  • Christian Hergert: Ignoring GtkTextTag when printing

    Previously, If you wanted to do this, you had to remove all your tags and then print, only to restore them afterwards. This should be a lot more convenient for people writing various GtkSourceView-based text editors. Although, I’m suspect many of them weren’t even doing this correctly to begin with, hence this PSA.

More in Tux Machines

Free Software and More

  • The Apache News Round-up: week ending 15 October 2021

    Happy Friday, everyone. The Apache community has had another great week.

  • The Intelligent Edge – Coming Soon to Arm DevSummit 2021 [Ed: What a ridiculous coredump of mindless buzzwords by SUSE]

    For those of us not keeping score, we’re at the cusp of a technology shockwave that will fundamentally change the way we live, work, and interact with each other. Some call it the fourth industrial revolution (I4). While the third industrial revolution was all about process and product automation, the fourth industrial revolution (from an IT perspective) will center on the fusion of IT and OT.

  • Five of Monday's 'All Things Open' Presentations We Wouldn't Miss - FOSS Force

    If you couldn’t make it to Raleigh, North Carolina to attend this year’s All Things Open, you’re in luck. You can go to the conference’s web site and register for the free online version of the event, which will include live streaming of all presentations happening at the event (including all keynotes), as well as a large number of prerecorded presentations that were put together specifically for the online audience. That’s how we at FOSS Force are planning on attending this year, although downtown Raleigh is only a couple of hours away by car.

  • Community Member Monday: Hlompho Mota

    I am a native of Lesotho, and a dreamer and a person who aspires to make changes. Currently I’m working in a business that serves other businesses in Lesotho to get recognition in the market, and generally grow to become more self-reliant. Other than my business, I do try and dabble in technology and try to understand how it works – and get a sense on how it can be relevant in the area of life that I live in at this moment. But besides that, I consider myself as lifelong learner and I hope that the learning will continue for the rest of my life. Currently, I’m a self-taught developer trying to participate in as many open-source projects as possible, with the hope of bringing much-needed development to my part of the world.

Programming Leftovers

  • Use KPNG to Write Specialized kube-proxiers

    The post will show you how to create a specialized service kube-proxy style network proxier using Kubernetes Proxy NG kpng without interfering with the existing kube-proxy. The kpng project aims at renewing the the default Kubernetes Service implementation, the "kube-proxy". An important feature of kpng is that it can be used as a library to create proxiers outside K8s. While this is useful for CNI-plugins that replaces the kube-proxy it also opens the possibility for anyone to create a proxier for a special purpose.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: dang 0.0.14: Several Updates

    A new release of the dang package arrived at CRAN a couple of hours ago, exactly eight months after the previous release. The dang package regroups a few functions of mine that had no other home as for example lsos() from a StackOverflow question from 2009 (!!), the overbought/oversold price band plotter from an older blog post, the market monitor from the last release as well the checkCRANStatus() function recently tweeted about by Tim Taylor. This release regroups a few small edits to several functions, adds a sample function for character encoding reading and conversion using a library already used by R (hence “look Ma, no new depends”), adds a weekday helper, and a sample usage (computing rolling min/max values) of a new simple vector class added to tidyCpp (and the function and class need to get another blog post or study …), and an experimental git sha1sum and date marker (as I am not the fan of autogenerated binaries from repos as opposed to marked released meaning: we may see different binary release with the same version number).

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.42 Learning With

    Daniel Sockwell was inspired by a blog post a few weeks ago about a bouncing balls demo. The result is a new framework for learning Raku, but this time with some nice graphics: Learn Raku With: HTML Balls. Apart from the technical points, it’s also a great way (for people without much programming experience) to get involved with Raku while creating graphics and animations, rather than textual output. Check it out!

  • Russ Allbery: rra-c-util 10.0

    It's been a while since I pushed out a release of my collection of utility libraries and test suite programs, so I've accumulated quite a lot of chanages. Here's a summary; for more, see the NEWS file.

  • 1.56.0 pre-release testing | Inside Rust Blog

    The 1.56.0 pre-release is ready for testing. The release is scheduled for this Thursday, October 21th. Release notes can be found here.

  • Apple Announces The M1 Pro / M1 Max, Asahi Linux Starts Eyeing Their Bring-Up

    Apple today announced the M1 Pro and M1 Max as their most powerful SoCs ever built by the company. The new chips feature up to a 10-core processor, 32-core GPU, and up to 64GB of unified memory. While the Apple M1 was already well regarded for its speed, the M1 Pro and M1 Max are said to deliver up to 70% faster CPU performance than last year's M1. Meanwhile the GPU within the M1 Pro is up to 2x faster than the M1 while the M1 Max's GPU is said to be 4x faster.

Mozilla Firefox: Spyware, Password Loggers, and Performance Monitoring

  • This Week in Glean: Designing a telemetry collection with Glean

    (“This Week in Glean” is a series of blog posts that the Glean Team at Mozilla is using to try to communicate better about our work. They could be release notes, documentation, hopes, dreams, or whatever: so long as it is inspired by Glean.) All “This Week in Glean” blog posts are listed in the TWiG index). Whenever I get a chance to write about Glean, I am usually writing about some aspects of working on Glean. This time around I’m going to turn that on its head by sharing my experience working with Glean as a consumer with metrics to collect, specifically in regards to designing a Nimbus health metrics collection. This post is about sharing what I learned from the experience and what I found to be the most important considerations when designing a telemetry collection. I’ve been helping develop Nimbus, Mozilla’s new experimentation platform, for a while now. It is one of many cross-platform tools written in Rust and it exists as part of the Mozilla Application Services collection of components. With Nimbus being used in more and more products we have a need to monitor its “health”, or how well it is performing in the wild. I took on this task of determining what we would need to measure and designing the telemetry and visualizations because I was interested in experiencing Glean from a consumer’s perspective.

  • Firefox Add-on Reviews: How to choose the right password manager browser extension

    All good password managers should, of course, effectively secure passwords; and they all basically do the same thing—you create a single, easy-to-remember master password to access your labyrinth of complex logins. Password managers not only spare you the hassle of remembering a maze of logins; they can also offer suggestions to help make your passwords even stronger. Fortunately there’s no shortage of capable password protectors out there. But with so many options, how to choose the one that’ll work best for you? Here are some of our favorite password managers. They all offer excellent password protection, but with distinct areas of strength.

  • Mozilla Performance Blog: Performance Sheriff Newsletter (September 2021)

    In September there were 174 alerts generated, resulting in 23 regression bugs being filed on average 6.4 days after the regressing change landed. Welcome to the September 2021 edition of the performance sheriffing newsletter. Here you’ll find the usual summary of our sheriffing efficiency metrics. If you’re interested (and if you have access) you can view the full dashboard.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • The NeuroFedora Blog: Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 25 October 1300 UTC

    Please join us at the next regular Open NeuroFedora team meeting on Monday 25 October at 1300UTC in #fedora-neuro on IRC (Libera.chat). The meeting is a public meeting, and open for everyone to attend.

  • Real-time Analytics News for Week Ending October 16 - RTInsights

    In this week’s real-time analytics news: Red Hat announced updates in its portfolio of tools and programs for building applications on Red Hat OpenShift, and more. Keeping pace with news and developments in the real-time analytics market can be a daunting task. We want to help by providing a summary of some of the items our staff came across each week. Here are some of the news items from this week: Red Hat announced a series of updates in its portfolio of developer tools and programs for developers building applications on Red Hat OpenShift. The updates were to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, Red Hat OpenShift GitOps, and the Red Hat build of Quarkus. Additionally, Red Hat expanded the roster of training resources available on Kube By Example.

  • What I learned about Kubernetes and Knative Serverless

    If you happened to miss this year’s Kubernetes Summer Camp, there’s some good news! The sessions were recorded and are available for on-demand viewing. Along with those, you’ll also get access to a variety of downloadable content, including a free O’Reilly e-book.

  • Awards roll call: August to October 2021 [Ed: Those accolades and fake rewards/awards can easily be bought; they let you game the system for money]

    From workplace accolades to product wins, we are proud to be able to highlight some aspects of our company and the recognition they’ve received in the past few months. We recently published our DEI Statement, which declares our commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion—not just for our associates, but for our partners, customers and open source contributors. Our culture is rooted in transparency, collaboration, and inclusion—open source principles that continue to drive our company forward. We see the following awards as a recognition of our open source-driven innovation, where the best ideas can come from anywhere and anyone.