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KDE and GTK/GNOME

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GNOME
  • GSoC 2021 KMyMoney - Post First Evals to Week 7

    I modified the code as suggested by my mentors that were related to coding conventions(according to C++, Qt and KDE).

    After adding the new members to the AlkOnlineQuoteSource constructor. I jumped into writing the unit tests. I realized that I haven’t added the new members in the function signature. After adding that, I build the files to check what all things break related to the constructor’s usage.

  • Peter Hutterer: libinput and hold gestures

    Thanks to the work done by Josè Expòsito, libinput 1.19 will ship with a new type of gesture: Hold Gestures. So far libinput supported swipe (moving multiple fingers in the same direction) and pinch (moving fingers towards each other or away from each other). These gestures are well-known, commonly used, and familiar to most users. For example, GNOME 40 recently has increased its use of touchpad gestures to switch between workspaces, etc. Swipe and pinch gestures require movement, it was not possible (for callers) to detect fingers on the touchpad that don't move.

    This gap is now filled by Hold gestures. These are triggered when a user puts fingers down on the touchpad, without moving the fingers. This allows for some new interactions and we had two specific ones in mind: hold-to-click, a common interaction on older touchscreen interfaces where holding a finger in place eventually triggers the context menu. On a touchpad, a three-finger hold could zoom in, or do dictionary lookups, or kill a kitten. Whatever matches your user interface most, I guess.

    The second interaction was the ability to stop kinetic scrolling. libinput does not actually provide kinetic scrolling, it merely provides the information needed in the client to do it there: specifically, it tells the caller when a finger was lifted off a touchpad at the end of a scroll movement. It's up to the caller (usually: the toolkit) to implement the kinetic scrolling effects. One missing piece was that while libinput provided information about lifting the fingers, it didn't provide information about putting fingers down again later - a common way to stop scrolling on other systems.

  • Christian Hergert: Ignoring GtkTextTag when printing

    Previously, If you wanted to do this, you had to remove all your tags and then print, only to restore them afterwards. This should be a lot more convenient for people writing various GtkSourceView-based text editors. Although, I’m suspect many of them weren’t even doing this correctly to begin with, hence this PSA.

More in Tux Machines

From ‘guix environment’ to ‘guix shell’

There are times when what looked like the right design choice some years back comes out as an odd choice as time passes. The beloved guix environment tool is having that fate. Its command-line interface has become non-intuitive and annoying for the most common use cases. Since it could not be changed without breaking compatibility in fundamental ways, we devised a new command meant to progressively replace it; guix shell—that’s the name we unimaginatively ended up with—has just landed after a three-week review period, itself a followup to discussions and hesitations on the best course of action. This post introduces guix shell, how it differs from guix environment, the choices we made, and why we hope you will like it. Read more

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Digest of YaST Development Sprints, SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1, and Documentation by Meike Chabowski

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprints 133 & 134

    Let us start by quoting our latest report: “regarding the management of users, we hope to report big improvements in the next blog post”. Time has indeed come and we can now announce we brought the revamped users management described in this monographic blog post to the last parts of YaST that were still not taking advantage of the new approach. The changes are receiving an extra round of testing with the help of the Quality Assurance team at SUSE before we submit them to openSUSE Tumbleweed. When that happens, both the interactive YaST module to manage users and groups and its corresponding command line interface (not to be confused with the ncurses-powered text mode) will start using useradd and friends to manage users, groups and the related configurations.

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1 is Generally Available

    Today, we are proud to announce the release of SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1 – a lightweight and secure operating system built for containerized and virtualized workloads. [...] SLE Micro can be used as a single-node container host, Kubernetes cluster node, single-node KVM virtualization host or in public cloud. Since its built to scale, customers can incorporate SLE Micro into their digital transformation plans – whether at the edge or supporting edge deployments with mainframes – in a way that allows them to transition workload designs from monolithic to microservices, at their own pace. They can start with container workloads or virtualize their current legacy workloads, then move to containerized workloads when they are ready, with no change in the underlying system platform.

  • SUSE Expands Computing Possibilities Beyond the Edge with SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1
  • SUSE Expands Computing Possibilities Beyond the Edge with SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1
  • Document formats – There is choice [Ed: Meike Chabowski on formats of documentation files in SUSE]

    For publishing large documentation projects, DocBook is the ideal framework. It consists of a language (DocBook XML) and a set of stylesheets to translate this language into different output formats such as HTML, PDF, and EPUB. The stylesheets define the layout you want to apply when transforming the XML sources into output formats. For SUSE documentation, we wrote our own XSLT stylesheets to ensure the corporate design is properly reflected. The language DocBook XML is based on the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and defines the content in a semantic way through elements like in HTML. DocBook itself is written as a schema that defines the element names and the content and where they can appear. The DocBook schema is used to fulfill two tasks: guided editing and validation. Guided editing is done via an XML editor (such as oXygen, Vim or Emacs). The editor reads in the DocBook schema and suggests which elements are allowed in the current context. Validation gives hints about structural errors in an XML document; this could, for example, be a missing element.

Authelia: Open-source SSO Single Sign-on for enterprise

Single Sign-on (SSO), is a technology that combines several app login screens into one single login. In contrast, it offers a session and user authentication service for a user to use a single login for many apps. Let us take Google as an example, soon as login into your Google Gmail account, you have access to all Google services like Google calendar, Google Drive, Developer account YouTube, and Google Play Store, and more other services. Read more

OVPN-Admin is a Simple Web UI to Manage OpenVPN Users

OVPN-Admin makes the administration of OpenVPN users, their certificates and routes quickly and easily by using a convenient web-based UI. OpenVPN is one of the most popular VPN protocols among VPN users. It’s both – a VPN protocol and software that uses VPN techniques to secure point-to-point and site-to-site connections. OpenVPN is an open source and free VPN option for those looking to protect their privacy. It uses the TLS/SSL protocol for key exchange and can travel through firewalls and NATs (Network Address Translators). However, the administration of the OpenVPN users requires certain level of skills with the Linux command line. Read more