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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • [JumpCloud] Recent Linux Releases: Desktop MFA & Security Commands

    Operating system diversity is a defining characteristic of today’s IT environments. Windows may have dominated historically, but enterprise Mac management has evolved in a meaningful way and Linux distributions have become a critical part of IT infrastructure. Cross-OS device management is here to stay, and presents a unique challenge for IT admins.

    Linux in particular can be a complex beast to manage because unlike MacOS and Windows, it is not a proprietary OS and can be found across multiple distros. There are many benefits to this openness however, including cost, interoperability, and flexibility. These factors, and more, have led to a strong Linux following among its community of users.

    With an increasing number of employee workstations running a wide variety of Linux distros, administrators need a way to increase visibility into their fleets, and improve the management of not only Linux systems, but Mac and Windows as well. IT admins can use the JumpCloud Directory Platform to comprehensively accomplish these tasks, thanks to the recent Linux releases detailed in this article.

  • Mozilla Security Blog: Making Client Certificates Available By Default in Firefox 90

    Starting with version 90, Firefox will automatically find and offer to use client authentication certificates provided by the operating system on macOS and Windows. This security and usability improvement has been available in Firefox since version 75, but previously end users had to manually enable it.

    When a web browser negotiates a secure connection with a website, the web server sends a certificate to the browser to prove its identity. Some websites (most commonly corporate authentication systems) request that the browser sends a certificate back to it as well, so that the website visitor can prove their identity to the website (similar to logging in with a username and password). This is sometimes called “mutual authentication”.

  • The Sequoia seq_file vulnerability

    A local root hole in the Linux kernel, called Sequoia, was disclosed by Qualys on July 20. A full system compromise is possible until the kernel is patched (or mitigations that may not be fully effective are applied). At its core, the vulnerability relies on a path through the kernel where 64-bit size_t values are "converted" to signed integers, which effectively results in an overflow. The flaw was reported to Red Hat on June 9, along with a local systemd denial-of-service vulnerability, leading to a kernel crash, found at the same time. Systems with untrusted local users need updates for both problems applied as soon as they are available—out of an abundance of caution, other systems likely should be updated as well.

    Down in the guts of the kernel's seq_file interface, which is used for handling virtual files in /proc and the like, buffers are needed to store each line of the file's "contents". To start, a page of memory is allocated for the buffer, but if that is not sufficient, a new buffer that is twice the size of the old one is allocated. This is all done using a size_t, which is an unsigned 64-bit quantity (on x86_64) that is large enough to hold the results, so "the system would run out of memory long before this multiplication overflows".

More in Tux Machines

Software: Matrix, Ktube, and Monero P2Pool

  • Chat Bubbles on Element and Several Matrix Apps

    This simple comparison wants to help everyone adopt alternative messaging technology, Matrix, with suitable user interface to them. We call Matrix Apps to instant messengers like Element, Fluffy, Nheko, Schildi and Spectral as they are created based upon the said technology. We will start by setting up criteria first that includes chat bubbles, then going through these messengers one by one, and you will see their pictures here along with a little comments from me. I hope you can pick up the messenger with UI you love the most from here.

  • Ktube Media Downloader lets you download YouTube videos easily on Linux

    I always like to tell people about how I have been using Linux as my primary operating system for over ten years. I love Linux, I understand it, it’s free and above all, it fits my workflow in a way Microsoft’s Windows (with all its goodness) probably never will. That also means I love and am a command-line ninja but I also know one thing, a lot of people out there fear and hate the command line.

  • Monero P2Pool V1.0 Is Released

    The latest version of P2Pool, a decentralized Monero mining pool has released. This is the first official release, signaling an invitation for more users to try out the new software.

Better Support & Performance For OpenACC Kernels Is Coming To GCC

While the GNU Compiler Collection has supported OpenACC for a few years now as this parallel programming standard popular with GPUs/accelerators, the current implementation has been found to be inadequate for many real-world HPC workloads leveraging OpenACC. Fortunately, Siemens has been working to improve GCC's OpenACC kernels support. GCC's existing OpenACC kernels construct has been found to be "unable to cope with many language constructs found in real HPC codes which generally leads to very bad performance." Fortunately, improvements are on the way and could potentially be mainlined in time for next year's GCC 12 stable release. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Database containing 106m Thailand travelers' details leaked • The Register

    A database containing personal information on 106 million international travelers to Thailand was exposed to the public internet this year, a Brit biz claimed this week. Bob Diachenko, head of cybersecurity research at product-comparison website Comparitech, said the Elasticsearch data store contained visitors' full names, passport numbers, arrival dates, visa types, residency status, and more. It was indexed by search engine Censys on August 20, and spotted by Diachenko two days later. There were no credentials in the database, which is said to have held records dating back a decade. “There are many people who would prefer their travel history and residency status not be publicized, so for them there are obvious privacy issues,” wrote Comparitech editor Paul Bischoff on the company’s blog.

  • Break out your emergency change process and patch this ransomware-friendly bug ASAP, says VMware

    VMware has disclosed a critical bug in its flagship vSphere and vCenter products and urged users to drop everything and patch it. The virtualization giant also offered a workaround.

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 185 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 185. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Mattia Rizzolo ]
    * Fix the autopkgtest in order to fix testing migration: the androguard
      Python module is not in the python3-androguard Debian package
    * Ignore a warning in the tests from the h5py package that doesn't concern
      diffoscope.
    
    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Bump Standards-Version to 4.6.0.
    

GNOME 41 Released. This is What's New.

GNOME team announced the release of GNOME 41 with some exceptional changes and updates. We wrap up the release in this post. Read more