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Fedora and IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2021-30

    Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)!

  • CodeFlare: A New Open-Source Framework For Big Data Integration And Scaling

    CodeFlare is all about end-to-end workflows and pipelines and aims to drastically reduce the time it takes to set up, run, and scale machine-learning tests. The motivation behind CodeFlare, according to Priya Nagpurkar, Director of Cloud Platform Research at IBM Research, “was the emergence of these converged workflows. So you have AI, machine learning, big data, and even simulations and modeling, all coming together into tightly integrated workflows.” But how does this differ from traditional AI/ML platforms? According to Nagpurkar, the difference is, “When I can think about my logic, and I have higher-level interfaces, and I don’t have to worry about the runtime aspects, how do I scale? How do I map it to massive infrastructure?” In the end, CodeFlare deals with workflows as a whole, instead of individual elements.

  • [IBM emeritus who originally brought GNU/Linux to IBM] The Coming Era of Productivity Growth

    “The last 15 years have been tough times for many Americans, but there are now encouraging signs of a turnaround,” wrote economists Erik Brynjolfsson and Georgios Petropoulos in The Coming Productivity Boom, a recent opinion article in the MIT Technology Review. “Productivity growth, a key driver for higher living standards, averaged only 1.3% since 2006, less than half the rate of the previous decade. But on June 3, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that US labour productivity increased by 5.4% in the first quarter of 2021. What’s better, there’s reason to believe that this is not just a blip, but rather a harbinger of better times ahead: a productivity surge that will match or surpass the boom times of the 1990s.”

    After growing at an average annual rate of around 2.8% between 1947 and 1973, US productivity has significantly slowed down, except for the Internet-driven productivity boost between 1996 and 2004. Despite the relentless advances of digital technologies over the past 15 years, - from smartphones and broadband wireless to cloud computing and machine learning, - productivity has only grown at an anemic 1.3%, between 2006 and 2019. Most OECD countries have seen similar slowdowns.

    What accounts for this puzzling so-called productivity paradox and when might it finally end? Over the past several years, Brynjolfsson and his various collaborators have explored this question, first at MIT where he was faculty director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy, and since 2020 at Stanford, where he’s Director of the Stanford Digital Economy Lab. Brynjolfsson discussed alternative explanations for the paradox at a recent MIT conference.

  • Open source meets open design (system)

    In 2019, the Red Hat User Experience (UX) team set out to create our Red Hat digital design system. It has evolved from a few research decks and Adobe XD files to a comprehensive shared design kit library and documentation website that many internal and external teams use every day.

    Our mandate was to design flexible building blocks and use new web technologies to create consistent user experiences that instill trust among visitors or customers who use our system of websites and apps. In this post, we’ll share some of our challenges, actions and outcomes.

More in Tux Machines

Free Software Stigma and Upcoming Events

  • Why Do Companies Still Have a Fear of Open Source?

    Open Source Software, since its birth, has made people wonder about its effects. The debate is never-ending, and for the right reasons. Giants like Apple have often viewed Open Source skeptically because they are mostly unfounded. However, one cannot deny that these sources are functional and flexible. They are also partly responsible for bringing the technological world in the right direction. But are they worth it? In this article, we shall learn all about open source companies and why use open source software, and why open source software is still not greeted warmly by certain companies. Therefore, without further ado, let's start right away.

  • Samuel Iglesias: X.Org Developers Conference 2021

    Last week we had our most loved annual conference: X.Org Developers Conference 2021. As a reminder, due to COVID-19 situation in Europe (and its respective restrictions on travel and events), we kept it virtual again this year… which is a pity as the former venue was Gdańsk, a very beautiful city (see picture below if you don’t believe me!) in Poland. Let’s see if we can finally have an XDC there! [...] Big shout-out to the XDC 2021 organizers (Intel) represented by Radosław Szwichtenberg, Ryszard Knop and Maciej Ramotowski. They did an awesome job on having a very smooth conference. I can tell you that they promptly fixed any issue that happened, all of that behind the scenes so that the attendees not even noticed anything most of the times! That is what good conference organizers do!

  • Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021

    This month has been nothing short of hectic, with back to back to back conferences filling up the calendar. Following Linaro Virual Connect, XDC, and Linux Plumbers (which ends today), Collaborans will be attending (virtually) next week's Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021. Connecting the open source ecosystem under one roof, the conference is "a unique environment for cross-collaboration between developers, sysadmins, devops, architects and others who are driving technology forward". Taking place from September 27-30, the event will be held in a hybrid format for the first time, with both in-person and virtual offerings, to ensure that everyone who wants to participate is able to do so.

Programming/Development Leftovers

  • New tool: an nginx playground

    On Wednesday I was talking to a friend about how it would be cool to have an nginx playground website where you can just paste in an nginx config and test it out. And then I realized it might actually be pretty easy to build, so got excited and started coding and I built it.

  • Pandas to check cell value is NaN

    The main documentation of the pandas is saying null values are missing values. We can denote the missing or null values as NaN in the pandas as most developers do. The NaN and None keywords are both used by developers to show the missing values in the dataframe. The best thing in the pandas is that it treats both NaN and None similarly. To check the missing value of a cell, pandas.notnull will return False in both cases of NaN and None if the cell has NaN or None. So, in this article, we will explore different methods to check whether a particular cell value is null or not (NaN or None).

  • gfldex: Convolution

    Flavio wrote a straightforward solution to PWC-131-1 and wondered if there is a idiomatic way. Assuming, that “idiomatic” means to use language features which lesser languages refuse to require, I’m happy to deliver convoluted code.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 131: Consecutive Arrays

    These are some answers to task 1 of the Week 131 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar. Spoiler Alert: This weekly challenge deadline is due in a few days from now (on September 26, 2021 at 24:00). This blog post offers some solutions to this challenge, please don’t read on if you intend to complete the challenge on your own.

  • My Favorite Modules: if | Tom Wyant [blogs.perl.org]

    My blog post My Favorite Warnings: redundant and missing touched on the use of the if module. Comments on that post made me think it deserved a top-level treatment, expanding on (though not necessarily improving on) Aristotle's comment.

CutefishOS: Unix-y development model? Check. macOS aesthetic? Check (if you like that sort of thing)

One of the reasons Linux has never caught on as a desktop operating system, as Linux fans know, is that Linux isn't a desktop operating system, it's a kernel. And assembling it into a coherent package users can install is the job of a distribution. This is a very different distribution model than the one Apple or Microsoft uses, and it confuses newcomers. Windows and macOS are easier to understand, they are single things made by single companies. Canonical and Red Hat notwithstanding, Linux is not packaged and presented this way at all. I've long believed that this difference is one of the key stumbling blocks to wider Linux adoption. Apple has macOS, Microsoft has Windows, Linux has... hundreds of awkward, confusingly named options. This is both Linux's greatest strength, and its greatest weakness. For those who already understand and use it the options are welcome. I've been a Linux user for over a decade and I've used several dozen distros, some of them so different from one another it's difficult to believe they're built from the same base. This wealth of options is great, but it's both confusing and overwhelming for new users. Distributions like elementary OS are popular with people switching from macOS and Windows because elementary OS offers that same highly polished, all-in-one package that makes the transition from proprietary operating systems smoother. But this is Linux, so you can't just have elementary OS. The latest distro to catch my eye is CutefishOS, which owes considerable design debt to both elementaryOS and the operating system made by that fruit company. Read more

BattlEye confirms Linux support for Steam Deck

  • BattlEye confirms Linux support for Steam Deck, will be opt-in like Easy Anti-Cheat

    Just recently we had Epic Games announce that Easy Anti-Cheat now offers proper native Linux support and in addition support for Wine and Steam Play Proton - now we have BattlEye also confirming the same readying up for the Steam Deck.

  • BattlEye To Support Valve's Steam Deck / Proton

    Yesterday it was Epic Games confirming Easy Anti-Cheat for Linux and Wine/Proton ahead of the Steam Deck launch and today it's BattlEye confirming Proton / Steam Deck support. BattlEye has already provided native Linux support albeit not widely used. Today they tweeted that they will also be supporting the upcoming Steam Deck or more specifically the use of BattlEye within Proton. BattlEye is making this opt-in for game developers who wish to support its usage under Wine / Proton.