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today's leftovers

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  • MySQL data types: Know the ones to use and how

    When creating a table in a database, it should have both a name and a data type. A column’s data type defines the values the column holds, such as integer, money, binary, character, date, and time. Therefore, it is a developer’s task to determine which data types will be stored in each column while creating databases and tables.

    In simple terms, data types are guidelines that aid SQL in understanding what type of data is required inside a column. It is also efficient in identifying how SQL interacts with the stored data.

    A point to note is that data types might contain different names in different databases, and in cases where the names are the same, other aspects and details such as size will differ. Therefore, it is recommended that you always refer to documentation whenever you encounter similar cases.

  • Mozilla VPN Review [Ed: One paragraph before last shows that Mozilla does not actually do VPN; it's a reseller for some dodgy company, reusing the Firefox brand to sell a bunch of crap or upsell (likely bogus privacy or a ticking time bomb)]

    Mozilla VPN protects your privacy, and your subscription fee supports a proponent of a free internet. It's a simple service for anyone who needs a virtual private network, but it offers no bonus privacy tools beyond the VPN.

    [...]

    Mozilla VPN is not, strictly speaking, wholly a Mozilla project like Firefox. Instead of building and maintaining the infrastructure required for a consumer VPN, Mozilla found another company to partner with. During Mozilla's earliest forays into the world of VPNs, Mozilla courted Editors' Choice-winner ProtonVPN.

  • Dealing with burnout in open source [Ed: Sorry, IBM/Red Hat... but burnout is burnout and can happen to anybody, nothing to do with Free software ("open source"); this is as silly as your several articles about breakfasts for "open source people" (as if coding and software licences affect your diet). You've run out of topics. This Web site called Open Source dot com has become a lot of openwashing, IBM marketing and general non-tech articles being painted with the "open" crush to make it seem "tech".]

    Burnout is something you don't expect to happen to you—until it does. The technology industry is one of the worst offenders; over 60% of industry professionals report they've experienced burnout. Sixty percent! Chances are, you or someone you know has dealt with it. How can we tackle such a staggering burnout rate if those who make decisions about mental health barely know what burnout is, never mind how to prevent it?

  • Recently and soon in openSUSE #1

    Today (Saturday 31st of August, 17:00 UTC) is the third installment of the recently rejuvenated Community meetings! Taking place on Jist Meet, it will be an excellent opportunity to discuss and coordinate on solutions for improving things in the Project.

    One important topic will be openSUSE Membership, soon to be affected by the shutdown of connect-o-o.

  • Instructions: Cut videos with Kdenlive on Linux and Windows [Ed: Automated translation]

    A small clip for social media, a YouTube video about the last big trip, the hobby or even short film projects: the open source software Kdenlive is a versatile video editor that can be used to create very different videos. Getting started is pleasantly easy And if you want, you can also build small animations, add a subtitle track to the video and render it in the appropriate format for the desired publication platform.

    Lots of effects and transitions provide variety, a library saves clips that are used frequently so that they are quickly available in all projects. Generators produce clips with a countdown, white noise, or a test pattern. The Kdenlive user interface can be adjusted in detail so that everything goes quickly when editing video.

  • My Work on Documentation (June/July)

    After two month in documentation I can tell you this: documentation in general is quite alive and kicking. Smile From the outside you might see outdated content here and there, but there are quite a few people working on improving that. Of course, as most things, it is a never-ending effort and every helping hand is appreciated. If you are interested in helping, please talk to us on our mailing list. One of the more time-consuming tasks is currently porting documentation from TechBase to the new Developer Portal. It's basically copy&paste with some adjustments, so volunteers welcome Smile

    For me the time flew by blazingly fast. In the beginning ... there was Akademy, the first conference for me. It meant getting up at 7 to go to work, joining Akademy when I came back home and staying up till midnight or longer for the last talks or events to finish. Processing and carving out the outcome of the three documentation BoF sessions is still on my todo list.

    In the time before and since Akademy, I have been busy reading through several years of documentation improvement planning backlog and fixing lots of smaller issues in existing docs in the wikis and on the new Developer Portal. This also included cleaning up some outdated content (EBN has been decommissioned) and proofreading other people's documentation-related merge requests when asked to do so.

    Unfortunately, my first contribution to one of the website's Git repositories is still unmerged at the time of writing. I blame me for that not keeping track of my own merge requests. But it also shows one of the things we need to put more effort into: closing merge requests (one way or another). Also, check your own merge requests once in a while.

  • You can get Delver, Tower of Time and more in the Humble RPG Heroes Bundle | GamingOnLinux

    It seems Humble Bundle are starting to ramp-up their game bundles again and they have another with the Humble RPG Heroes Bundle that has some great games inside.

    The bundle is on the smaller side though but even so, what's there seems like a pretty good deal overall with some real indie gems included.

  • Using FSR To Boost Any Game’s Framerate on Linux

    Ever heard of the little war between AMD and Nvidia regarding upscaling technologies? Nvidia has DLSS (Deep Learning Super Sampling) and AMD has recently released FSR (FidelityFX Super Resolution).

    [...]

    On Linux, we have an extra opportunity to use FSR, without asking anyone to do anything. Proton already has a full screen hack upscaler included, which prevents Windows games from trying to change the current screen’s resolution. This hack instead uses a software upscaler pretending the resolution change is happening while remaining at the native monitor’s resolution. If an old game uses 800×600 as maximum resolution, the upscaler will fill your 1920×1080 screen by scaling up that tiny picture so that it fits in the larger monitor screen.

    Some folks have had the genius idea to simply replace the basic upscaler included in Proton by… AMD’s FSR! It makes it work out of the work on any game that uses Vulkan through ProtonGE – a benefit that Windows gamers can’t get for now!

    Of course, this is NOT how you are supposed to use FSR: ideally you want to apply FSR on a picture before the HUD and the post processing is applied, but still, it’s an acceptable usage of the upscaler, and provide massive performance boosts. You can see the video I published earlier today for Max Payne 3 and how much boost I can get from a meager Nvidia GTX 1060 3GB (with 470.x drivers), without much visual information loss (Using Proton-6.13-GE-1).

  • How microservices and containers work, apart and together

    CMicroservices and containers are two methods that enable companies to more efficiently create and deliver applications. Here's how they work -- and when they're best used together.

    Containers and microservices are related concepts that help companies design and adopt applications with speed, efficiency and flexibility. It's hard to talk about one without also talking about the other. Microservices and containers are distinct technologies -- they don't have to be used together, but they often are. Let's break down how each works, their key similarities and differences, and how an enterprise can use them in tandem.

    What are microservices?

    Microservices are individual units of software that combine to provide all of the functions required to run an application. Typically, each microservice handles a discrete type of functionality within an application. For example, one microservice handles logins, another generates the UI, another populates the interface with content specific to each user session and yet another interfaces with the database that stores user data.

    Until about 2010, most applications were monolithic designs in which the entire application ran as a single unit and, in most cases, as a single process. Prior to wide adoption of the internet and APIs, a service-oriented architecture (SOA) approach evolved to break applications into somewhat smaller pieces. However, the individual services within an SOA are typically not as small or dynamic as microservices.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Proton, Neptune 15 v2, and VR

  • What is Proton? | TechRadar

    You may have seen lots of mentions of Proton with the upcoming launch of the Steam Deck handheld game console, but what is it, and how does it work? Proton is a piece of software created by Valve and CodeWeavers that acts as a compatibility layer that allows games designed for the Windows 10 and Windows 11 operating systems to run in Linux with a minimal impact on performance. Proton is based on the existing WINE tool, which allowed Windows applications to run in Linux, with Valve and CodeWeavers taking the tech and using it to specifically run games. This is incredibly useful, as the vast majority of games are coded for Windows, due to the sheer popularity of Microsoft’s operating system. Linux, a free and open-source operating system, is relatively niche, which meant that many game developers couldn’t – or wouldn’t – spend resources on making a port of their games to run natively on Linux.

  • Neptune 15 v2 from Juno is a Linux Gaming Laptop with 240 Hz Display

    The Neptune 15″ V2 from Juno Computers is powered by Intel’s 10th-gen Comet Lake chipsets, and can be configured with up to 64GB of RAM. Nowadays, it is a little difficult to choose a perfect Linux gaming laptop, but it is not impossible to get it. As well as, these laptops are prepaid with full advantages like an additional graphic card with a brilliant CPU. In fact, some of the best Linux gaming laptops offer up the same durability and premium design as their Windows counterparts. They’ll also cost less since there’s no Windows license included with the laptop.

  • Humble has a nice looking VR bundle if you need some more games | GamingOnLinux

    Do you have a VR kit that's begging to be played? Check out the Fall VR Emporium Bundle over on Humble Bundle. Sadly, there's not many native / supported Linux VR games and so you're going to need Steam Play Proton to enjoy this set of games.

Plasma 5.23 Anniversary Edition Beta available for testing

Are you using Kubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo, our current Stable release? Or are you already running our development builds of the upcoming 21.10 Impish Indri? We currently have Plasma 5.22.90 (Plasma 5.23 Anniversary Edition Beta) available in our Beta PPA for Kubuntu 21.04, and 21.10 development series. However this is a beta release, and we should re-iterate the disclaimer from the upstream release announcement... Read more Also: Using KNotifications in QML

Top 20 Open-source solutions for Photographers

In today world, editing photos is a critical component in the overall photography process, and it was taken a new level of importance. As demand continues to rise and the market is filled with plenty of capable options, we will suggest top 20 apps to enhance your photography workflow. We take many free high-quality photo editors without having to pay for an expensive program to edit your image like a pro. Read more

LibreOffice 8.0 New tabbed interface layout available

Muttakin Rizal ( Rizal Muttaqin ), one of the designers LibreOffice office suite, has published in his blog, the user interface possible development plan LibreOffice 8.0. The most notable innovation is the built-in support for tabs, through which you can quickly switch between different documents, similar to how switching between sites is carried out in modern browsers. If necessary, each tab can be unpinned in the form of a separate window, or vice versa, convert the window into a tab. It is also possible to collapse all tabs into a drop-down list accessible by pressing the “^” button. The header also shows a LibreOffice button to launch the initial interface, which was previously shown when starting or closing all documents, to open a file, visually evaluate recently opened documents, or create a new document based on a template. Read more