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Steam Survey Shows Linux Marketshare Hitting 1.0%

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Gaming

Not only did Valve announce Steam Deck in July but the overall Linux gaming marketshare according to the Steam Survey also hit a multi-year high.

According to the Steam Survey numbers out today for July 2021, Steam on Linux hit a 1.0% marketshare, or a +0.14% increase over the month prior.

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Linux has finally hit that almost mythical 1% user share...

  • Linux has finally hit that almost mythical 1% user share on Steam again

    The day I'm sure many have been waiting for, and just as many probably thought it wouldn't happen. Linux has finally hit 1% again on the Steam Hardware Survey.

    Not the first time, in fact years ago when Steam for Linux was pretty fresh we actually saw it remain over 1% for a while. That didn't last long though, and it's been bouncing around at sub 1% for multiple years now as we've been showing on our dedicated Steam Tracker.

Steam Survey: Linux Gaming Market Share Climbs to 1%...

  • Steam Survey: Linux Gaming Market Share Climbs to 1% For First Time in Years

    Valve has today published its monthly update for Steam Hardware Survey, with an update for July. Besides the regular fluctuations in the market share of CPU and GPU vendors, there is another interesting change slowly happening. According to the newest data from the survey, gaming on Linux has climbed to 1.0% for the first time in years.

    Back in 2018, Valve introduced Proton, a technology that translates Windows-specific API calls to Linux equivalents, enabling thousands of Linux gamers to play the games that they wanted to, but were unable because they weren't using Windows OS.

    At the same time, many Linux gamers were trying out the Proton software and the market share of Linux gamers managed to climb to around 2% of a much smaller Steam customer base. However, after this testing period ended, only 0.8-0.9% of gamers were still using Linux distros, and the percentages stayed within that range for some time.

Steam Survey: Linux Gaming Market Share Climbs to 1%...

  • Steam Survey: Linux Gaming Market Share Climbs to 1% For First Time in Years

    Valve has today published its monthly update for Steam Hardware Survey, with an update for July. Besides the regular fluctuations in the market share of CPU and GPU vendors, there is another interesting change slowly happening. According to the newest data from the survey, gaming on Linux has climbed to 1.0% for the first time in years.

    Back in 2018, Valve introduced Proton, a technology that translates Windows-specific API calls to Linux equivalents, enabling thousands of Linux gamers to play the games that they wanted to, but were unable because they weren't using Windows OS.

    At the same time, many Linux gamers were trying out the Proton software and the market share of Linux gamers managed to climb to around 2% of a much smaller Steam customer base. However, after this testing period ended, only 0.8-0.9% of gamers were still using Linux distros, and the percentages stayed within that range for some time.

Percentage of Linux Gamers on Steam Tops 1% for First Time

  • Percentage of Linux Gamers on Steam Tops 1% for First Time in Years

    Gaming on Linux is still niche, but the number of users doing so has recently shot up, according to Valve’s Steam.

    In July, the market share for Linux-based gaming on Steam reached the 1% threshold after three years of remaining at the 0.8 to 0.9% range. GamingOnLinux noticed the sudden increase through Steam’s hardware and software survey, which regularly polls users to see what platforms they use to game.

Percentage of Linux Gamers on Steam Tops 1% for First Time

  • Percentage of Linux Gamers on Steam Tops 1% for First Time in Years

    Gaming on Linux is still niche, but the number of users doing so has recently shot up, according to Valve’s Steam.

    In July, the market share for Linux-based gaming on Steam reached the 1% threshold after three years of remaining at the 0.8 to 0.9% range. GamingOnLinux noticed the sudden increase through Steam’s hardware and software survey, which regularly polls users to see what platforms they use to game.

Latest Steam Survey Notes Linux Gaming Market Share Hits 1%

  • Latest Steam Survey Notes Linux Gaming Market Share Hits 1%

    Linux wasn’t really popular for its gaming capabilities until Proton stepped in and revolutionized one of the weakest areas of the OS. A recent steam survey shows that Linux gaming has hit a 1% market share, which is the all-time high for the OS.

    Steam released a survey today, which shows that the market share has hit 1%, a 0.14% increase since last year. Of course, this isn’t a huge feat in itself, but we understand from these numbers that gaming on Linux is getting better with each year.

Linux Now Makes Up 1% Of Steam Users Once Again

  • Linux Now Makes Up 1% Of Steam Users Once Again

    Linux has always been a popular operating system for a certain kind of user, but it's always presented complications if you want to play a wide variety of games. Now, however, the number of monthly active Steam users running Linux has risen to 1%, according to the Steam Hardware Survey.

    As spotted by the Linux site GamingOnLinux, the percentage of Linux users on Steam has increased and decreased over the past three years, but the overall line of fit tends towards the positive. This is the first time that the tracker has shown above a 1% Linux share since at least September 2018.

Steam Hardware Survey Shows Linux Finally Breaks the 1% Barrier

  • Steam Hardware Survey Shows Linux Finally Breaks the 1% Barrier

    The monthly Steam Hardware Survey is quite possibly one of the best windows we get into not only how consumers are playing games but how their hardware is transitioning to keep up with the graphical advances. It’s also pretty handy for judging which operating system currently holds the biggest slice of the gaming pie. Following the release of the latest figures, however, Linux’s quite devoted fanbase is undoubtedly going to be exceptionally happy as for the time ever (to my knowledge) the operating system has finally hit the magical 1% market share figure on the platform.

    [...]

    We daresay that Microsoft is exceptionally unhappy that their Windows 10 (64 bit) user-based is down in the latest Steam Hardware Survey. More so likely in the fact that those users who did decide to leave the platform have seemingly chosen Windows 7 as a seemingly more viable alternative, or worse, their pretty much sole nemesis Linux.

    While Linux clearly still has a long way to go, as noted above, the operating system is very popular, and you’ll struggle to find someone using it who has any complaints. With 1% now hit though, who knows, maybe more developers will start looking at making their games compatible with it.

Linux takes 1% of Steam market share as interest...

  • Linux takes 1% of Steam market share as interest in Steam Deck rises

    Valve published its monthly Steam Hardware Survey for July, and the biggest surprise came from the Linux gaming crowd. Aside from showing the usual Nvidia and Intel dominance in GPUs and CPUs usage among Steam users, there weren't many new takeaways from the latest report except Linux gaming rising to 1% in July, a first in years.

    The fact that coincides with the unveiling of the Linux-powered Steam Deck surely can't be ignored. It seems likely gamers will have started to investigate whether their Steam libraries really will be playable on Valve's new handheld gaming PC when it launches in December.

    Sweclockers suggests the last time Linux saw a spike remotely this close was a 2% market share jump when Valve announced Proton, a compatibility layer that allows Windows games to run on Linux, back in 2018. As impressive as Proton's first outing was, it still struggled to deliver as compelling a gaming experience as either native Linux ports, or gaming on a Windows OS. We haven't found evidence of that 2% spike ourselves, which could mean it tapered off real quick.

    For context, Linux gaming has historically sat below 1%, according to the folks at gamingonlinux who have been tracking market share of the open source OS for a good few years now. They estimate that over 1.2 million active Linux users are currently on Steam, and the trend seems to be moving upward.

Linux Now Has a 1% OS Market Share As Demand for Steam Deck...

  • Linux Now Has a 1% OS Market Share As Demand for Steam Deck Increases

    The latest Steam Hardware Survey now has the open-source OS gaining a 1% market share in a market dominated by Windows and MacOS. According to PCGamer, this is the first time Linux has earned a market share number of about 1% in years.

    Many experts believe this is due to the upcoming release of the Steam Deck handheld console from Valve. The system is running SteamOS, which is based on Linux. According to some industry insiders, the growing popularity of the Steam Deck might be causing an uptick in Linux users, considering it's free software.

    This climb in Linux usage comes after a slight drop that stemmed from the temporary release of Proton. According to Tom's Hardware, it was designed to enable Linux users to play Windows games but can't due to compatibility issues. During that time, the open-source software's market share was as high as 2%, but eventually fell back down to around 0.8 to 0.9%, where it remained until now.

According to the Steam Hardware Survey...

  • Steam on Linux Finally Hits 1% User Share for First Time in Years

    According to the Steam Hardware Survey, this is the first time that the tracker has shown above an 1% Linux share since at least September 2018.

    Linux has always been a popular operating system for a certain kind of user, but it’s always presented complications if you want to play a wide variety of games. It might not be an operating system that is in the mouths of every gamer in the world. Now, however, the number of monthly active Steam users running Linux has risen to 1%, according to the Steam Hardware Survey.

Steam Deck Popularity Leads to Spike in Linux Use

  • Steam Deck Popularity Leads to Spike in Linux Use

    Given that the upcoming hand-held PC by Valve has its operating system based on Linux, it's not too surprising that the Steam Deck crew are keen to make use of the open-source system, even if it's not the powerhouse that Windows is. Recently, both Valve and Nvidia teamed up to bring DLSS to Linux systems. Now, it seems as though the OS has another reason to celebrate, possibly thanks to the developer and publisher's upcoming hand-held device.

    In a recent report, it's been announced that interest in Linux has risen, showing that more people are now starting to use the operating system, according to a survey on Steam hardware. While there doesn't seem to be any way to know for sure, it's entirely possible that this increase has occurred thanks to the announcement of the Steam Deck. The report goes on to estimate that if the number of Steam users a month has averaged around 120 million since the start of the year, then just over 1.2 million of them were active Linux users. This puts the open-source software into the 1% market share.

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