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Free Software Leftovers

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  • Google hits undo on Chrome browser alert change that broke websites, web apps

    Google has temporarily reversed Chrome's removal of browser alert windows and other prompts created via cross-origin iframes after a rocky rollout over the past two weeks broke web apps and alarmed developers.

    An iframe, or Inline Frame, is a portion of a web page embedded in another web page. When it includes resources from a different origin or domain, it's a cross-origin iframe.

    Since March, 2020, the team behind Chromium, the open-source engine of Chrome, has been planning to limit the capabilities of cross-origin iframes because they're a security liability. Specifically, they allow an embedded resource like an ad to present a prompt as if it were the host domain.

  • TenFourFox FPR32 SPR3 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 32 Security Parity Release 3 "32.3" is available for testing (downloads, hashes). There are, once again, no changes to the release notes and nothing notable regarding the security patches in this release. Assuming no major problems, FPR32.3 will go live Monday evening Pacific time as usual. FPR32.4 will appear on September 7 and the final official build FPR32.5 on October 5.

  • dbForge Schema Compare for PostgreSQL 1.2 Released with a Bunch of New Features

    Devart rolled out dbForge Schema Compare for PostgreSQL version 1.2. The release brought a number of new features and major improvements.

    Devart, one of the leading developers of database management software, ALM solutions, and data providers for the most popular database servers, introduced the update of dbForge Schema Compare for PostgreSQL - version 1.2.

  • New Release!

    MR12.7 has been released. See MR12.7 for information about this new release.

  • MULTICS Gets A New Release… 52 Years After Launch | Hackaday

    If you have ever read anything about the history of UNIX, you may remember that its early development was influenced by an older operating system. MULTICS was developed in the 1960s by MIT and General Electric as a commercial operating system, and had been the system which UNIX writers [Thompson] and [Ritchie] had used. It became a Honeywell product, and the source code for its final commercial version was eventually released to the public. Has it become a dusty relic of interest only to historians? Seemingly not, because a new version has been released. It’s intended for us on the dps8m Honeywell mainframe simulator rather than physical hardware, so perhaps while it’s not such a dusty relic it remains something only for the enthusiast.

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