Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SCO Unveils Latest Product Upgrade: IBM Lawsuit 4.0

Filed under
Humor

The SCO Group, everybody's favorite lawsuit-factory-disguised-as-a-software-vendor, today unveiled version 4.0 of its flagship litigation product, SCO v. IBM.

"Our top-of-the-line product now boasts new arguments, new evidence, new discovery demands, and new counter-counter-counter-motions designed to provide additional value to our customers and shareholders," said SCO's Assistant Vice Director Media Relations Specialist Third Class.

According to a four-color glossy brochure distributed by SCO, the cornerstone of IBM Lawsuit Amended Complaint 4.0 is the argument that GPL-licensed code should be seized under eminent domain laws to provide greater economic development.

"All of this valuable code is being squandered by the draconian anti-corporate, anti-American, pro-pinko-Commie GPL license that the Free Software Foundation has rammed down everybody's throats," says the brochure. "But thanks to the recent decision by the Supreme Court, the tyranny of the GPL can -- and must -- be stopped through the eminent domain process."

SCO proposes that all of the open source code held by the FSF, IBM, and Novell should be "liberated" and turned over to SCO. In its Complaint 4.0, SCO argues that "this move will provide huge public benefits by increasing tax revenue, creating jobs, protecting national security, fighting terrorism, and boosting economic development efforts nationwide."

In addition, SCO's upgraded litigation product (all 512 pages) includes the following new-and-improved contentions:

  • The GPL establishes an illegal monopoly

  • The GPL promotes slavery
  • Free software represents illegal campaign contributions
  • Open Source harms the environment
  • GPL undermines national security and aids terrorists
  • Open Source development violates child labor laws
  • The Linux mascot is degrading to penguins

Punchline.

More in Tux Machines

SUSE Leftovers

  • openSUSE Heroes meeting, day 2
    After a long, but exciting first day, we even managed to get some sleep before we started again and discussed the whole morning about our policies and other stuff that is now updated in the openSUSE wiki. After that, we went out for a nice lunch…
  • Installing Tumbleweed, November 2016
    The Tumbleweed system that I already have installed had desktops KDE, Gnome, XFCE and LXDE. But for recent intstalls (as with Leap 42.2), I have been going with KDE, Gnome, XFCE, LXQt, FVWM and MATE. So it seemed reasonable for the new Tumbleweed install to follow the same path. I also added Enlightenment for experimenting.

Android Leftovers

Linux Graphics

  • LibRetro's Vulkan PlayStation PSX Renderer Released
    A few days back I wrote about a Vulkan renderer for a PlayStation emulator being worked on and now the code to that Vulkan renderer is publicly available. For those wanting to relive some PlayStation One games this week or just looking for a new test case for Vulkan drivers, the Vulkan renderer for the LibRetro Beetle/Mednafen PSX emulator is now available, months after the LibRetro folks made a Vulkan renderer for the Nintendo 64 emulator.
  • Etnaviv DRM Updates Submitted For Linux 4.10
    The Etnaviv DRM-Next pull request is not nearly as exciting as MSM getting Adreno 500 series support, a lot of Intel changes, or the numerous AMDGPU changes, but it's not bad either for a community-driven, reverse-engineered DRM driver for the Vivante graphics cores.
  • Mesa 12.0.4 Being Prepped For Ubuntu 16.10/16.04
    Ubuntu is preparing Mesa 12.0.4 for Ubuntu Xenial and Yakkety users. It's not as great as Mesa 13, but at least there are some important fixes back-ported. Mesa 12.0.4 is exciting for dozens of bug fixes, including the work to offer better RadeonSI performance. But with Mesa 12.0.4 you don't have the RADV Vulkan driver, OpenGL 4.5, or the other exciting Mesa 13 work.

Games for GNU/Linux