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Games: Kraken Academy, Galactic Chef, Macromedia Director, and MultiZork

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Gaming
  • Save your school in Kraken Academy!! with the help of a time-loop on September 10 | GamingOnLinux

    Kraken Academy!! sounds like a wonderfully weird game where you attending the most unusual high-school that's full of ghosts, cultists, crocodiles and a magical Kraken. Described in their email as "groundhog-day adventure inspired by 90s comedy anime" and that pretty much sold me right away.

    In the game you need to find a traitor who is trying to apparently destroy everything and they could be anyone at your school. Thankfully some friendly magical Kraken decides to bestow upon you the ability to time travel so you loop over and over, each time getting that little bit closer to find out who this traitor is. Sounds wild.

  • Play through a sci-fi cooking competition show in Galactic Chef | GamingOnLinux

    Thoughtquake Studios are currently developing Galactic Chef, a fun spin on cooking games with a sci-fi theme where you take part in a competitive cooking show.

    Featuring procedural generation to make it meals fresh each time, along with plenty of voxels you will make up some fancy looking delights while being scored by alien judges on flavour, texture, ambition, technical execution, and the unique requirements of each challenge. It honestly sounds great with it being simulated quite a bit behind the scenes on how the different ingredients and their voxels react to heat, moisture, damage, and more.

  • ScummVM continues keeping games alive with early Macromedia Director support | GamingOnLinux

    Remember any classic games made with Macromedia Director? Well you're in luck, as the ScummVM project is adding in some early support for it.

    For those unaware ScummVM is a free and open source application that allow you to run tons of classic graphical adventure and role-playing games, as long as you have the data files needed. This allows you to easily play them on modern systems, often with enhancements to make the experience a bit smoother.

  • Icculus has released MultiZork, making the 1980 classic Zork multiplayer | GamingOnLinux

    Some games live on forever and that's very much the case with Zork, a true classic interactive fiction adventure from 1980 and thanks to Ryan "Icculus" Gordon there's also now MultiZork.

    In a post on Patreon, Icculus gives a brief history of their love for Zork, a game that "not only uses its own programming language, it uses its own CPU" and so it's been made to run practically everywhere. As long as a system had a working Z-Machine emulator it would work, and that was needed as this was back in the days where there wasn't much of a standard for PC systems. All it needs is a working text interface and so you can play it across so many places.

    For fun Icculus wrote MojoZork, a "single C file that is just enough of the Z-Machine to complete Zork 1 (and probably several other early Infocom games)" and it seems due to the way it was made there's just enough room to squeeze in a couple of extra players and so that's what Icculus did.

More in Tux Machines

Announcing the election for the next TDF Board of Directors

On October 18, we officially announced the upcoming election for the next Board of Directors of The Document Foundation, the non-profit entity behind LibreOffice. As per § 7 II of our statutes (binding German version and non-binding English translartion) the Board’s term lasts two years. The current Board started its duty on February 18, 2020. Therefore, the old Board remains in charge until the end of February 17, 2022, so the new Board will be in charge the day after that, which is February 18, 2022. That upcoming term will then (regularly) end on February 17, 2024, so the next election of the Board of Directors will take place before. As per § 6 III, only members of the Board of Trustees of The Document Foundation, as well as current members of any of its bodies, are eligible to be elected into the Board of Directors, and the election is prepared and supervised by the Membership Committee (§ 7 II). Read more

VirtualBox 6.1.28 Released with Initial Support for Linux 5.14 and 5.15 Kernels

VirtualBox 6.1.28 is here about three months after VirtualBox 6.1.26 to introduce initial guest and host support for the Linux 5.14 and 5.15 kernel series. This means that you can now use VirtualBox on GNU/Linux systems powered by Linux kernels 5.14 or 5.15, as well as to run distributions powered by Linux 5.14 or 5.15 kernels inside virtual machines. In addition, this release introduces initial support for the upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.5 operating system, improves the detection of kernel modules in Linux hosts to prevent unnecessary rebuilds, fixes a display corruption on Linux Mint systems, and adds bindings support for Python 3.9. Read more

More Mozilla Spying and Management Shuffle

  • William Lachance: Learning about Psychological Safety at the Recurse Center

    Some context: I’m currently working as a software engineer at Mozilla, building out our data pipeline and analysis tooling. I’ve been at my current position for more than 10 years (my “anniversary” actually passed while I was out). I started out as a senior engineer in 2011, and was promoted to staff engineer in 2016. In tech-land, this is a really long tenure at a company. I felt like it was time to take a break from my day-to-day, explore some new ideas and concepts, and hopefully expose myself to a broader group of people in my field. My original thinking was that I would mostly be spending this time building out an interactive computation environment I’ve been working on called Irydium. And I did quite a bit of that. However, I think the main thing I took away from this experience was some insight on what makes a remote environment for knowledge work really “click”. In particular, what makes somewhere feel psychologically safe, and how this feeling allows us to innovate and do our best work. While the Recurse Center obviously has different goals than an organization that builds and delivers consumer software, I do think there are some things that it does that could be applied to Mozilla (and, likely, many other tech workplaces).

  • [Older] Firefox Now Sends Your Address Bar Keystrokes to Mozilla

    Firefox now sends more data than you might think to Mozilla. To power Firefox Suggest, Firefox sends the keystrokes you type into your address bar, your location information, and more to Mozilla’s servers. Here’s exactly what Firefox is sharing and how to control it.

  • Support.Mozilla.Org: What’s up with SUMO – October 2021

    As we enter October, I hope you’re all pumped up to welcome the last quarter of the year and, basically, wrapping up projects that we have for the remainder of the year. With that spirit, let’s start by welcoming the following folks into our community. [...] Thanks for Jefferson Scher for straightening the Firefox Suggest confusion on Reddit. That definitely help people to understand the feature better.

  • Welcome Imo Udom, Mozilla’s new Senior Vice President, Innovation Ecosystems

    I am delighted to share that Imo Udom has joined Mozilla as Senior Vice President, Innovation Ecosystems. Imo brings a unique combination of strategy, technical and product expertise and an entrepreneurial spirit to Mozilla and our work to design, develop and deliver new products and services.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (redmine and strongswan), Fedora (containerd, fail2ban, grafana, moby-engine, and thunderbird), openSUSE (curl, firefox, glibc, kernel, libqt5-qtsvg, rpm, ssh-audit, systemd, and webkit2gtk3), Red Hat (389-ds:1.4, curl, kernel, kernel-rt, redis:5, and systemd), SUSE (util-linux), and Ubuntu (ardour, linux-azure, linux-azure-5.11, and strongswan).

  • Best Open Source Security Tools | eSecurityPlanet

    Over the past quarter of a century, the open source movement has gone from strength to strength. But that success and the openness inherent in the community have led to a major challenge – security. The more software that is developed, the greater the likelihood there is for vulnerabilities. To make matters worse, the open source world prides itself on openness and transparency. Therefore, any security vulnerabilities are disclosed publicly. In this age of organized gangs of cybercriminals, that is like placing an ad asking for an attack. This has given rise to a large number of open source security tools. They take care of all aspects of the management of security in open source components, examine dependencies, fix bugs in code, and lower risk.

  • Credit card PINs can be guessed even when covering the ATM pad

    Researchers have proven it’s possible to train a special-purpose deep-learning algorithm that can guess 4-digit card PINs 41% of the time, even if the victim is covering the pad with their hands. The attack requires the setting up of a replica of the target ATM because training the algorithm for the specific dimensions and key spacing of the different PIN pads is crucially important.

  • Using Machine Learning to Guess PINs from Video - Schneier on Security

    This works even if the person is covering the pad with their hands.

  • Google Developing "SiliFuzz" For Fuzzing CPUs To Uncover Electrical Defects - Phoronix

    With OSS-Fuzz for continuous fuzzing of open-source projects and along with working on the various sanitizers for compilers, Google has been doing a lot for proactively uncovering software defects in key open-source projects. Now though a group of their engineers have been working on SiliFuzz for software aiming to discover new CPU defects.