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Next OpenOffice release to include Pentaho BI

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OOo

OpenOffice.org estimates it has more than 40 million users around the world. The open-source desktop suite is included in several of the leading Linux distributions including Red Hat Inc.'s eponymous offering, Novell Inc.'s Suse Linux and Canonical Ltd.'s Ubuntu.

Pentaho's reporting engine, Pentaho Reporting, will be integrated with the next release of OpenOffice.org, version 2.3, which is due out in the second half of this year, according to Lance Walter, vice president of marketing at Pentaho. Sun and Pentaho had been in discussions for around a year about integrating BI functionality into OpenOffice.org, he said.

The combination of Pentaho Reporting with a new Report Designer developed by Sun will enable OpenOffice.org users to create reports containing content from the OpenOffice.org Base database as well as from a variety of proprietary and open-source relational databases and other sources.

Full Story.

The GravityZoo OOo porting project

Date: Mon, 16 Apr 2007 00:38:36 +0200
From: Marcel v. Birgelen
Subject: The GravityZoo OOo porting project

In the past 3 years we have been working on the GravityZoo Framework, a
networked computing platform. Applications written or adapted for this
platform run "in the network", rather than just on a server or client.
The framework can be used among others to transform existing
applications into "net enabled" applications which can be hosted in the
framework and become accessible from practically any device via an IP
network.

At this moment we are preparing a GravityZoo OpenOffice.org porting
project. Our goal is to bring OpenOffice.org to the GravityZoo
Framework. In essence we want to bring OOo to the Internet for the
delivery as a service to the community.

When OpenOffice.org is "GravityZood", it will become a suite of
productivity applications that are always available, online, via a broad
range of devices.

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