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People Behind KDE: Volker Krause

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KDE

For the next interview in the fortnightly People Behind KDE series we travel over to Germany to talk to the key to your personal information storage, a highly dedicated KDE-PIM developer (though hide any small animals when visiting his apartment!) - tonight's star of People Behind KDE is Volker Krause.

A SHORT INTRO

Age: 26
Located in: Aachen, Germany
Occupation: Student of Computer Science at RWTH Aachen
Software Developer at Klarälvdalens Datakonsult AB (KDAB)
Nickname on IRC: vkrause
Claim to Fame: Akonadi, KNode and various other stuff in KDE-PIM
Fav. KDE applications: Kontact, the KatePart, minicli
Hardware: Athlon 64 X2 4200+ workstation and a Thinkpad R52 Pentium M 2GHz

THE INTERVIEW

In what ways do you make a contribution to KDE?

In my spare time I'm currently working on Akonadi, the next-generation PIM data management framework. I also maintain KNode, KDE's news reader and try to keep an eye on KMime, KDE's MIME handling library.

At work I'm adding various features to Kontact, with KMail being the most prominent victim.

Full Story.

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