Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Did Intel Kill Opteron?

In April 2003, AMD released Opteron, a fancy new chip designed for servers. Analysts said it was cheaper, faster and guzzled less power than anything else on the market, including Intel's muscular Itanium chip, which debuted in 2001 but never lived up to expectations.

AMD had done its homework during the design process. While both Opteron and Itanium ran newer 64-bit software, AMD's chip was also backward-compatible, enabling it to run software written for older 32-bit processors. That made it more practical in corporate data centers, which run a lot of older software.

A year after the Opteron chip hit the market, we recognized that AMD was winning over some big customers and seemed poised to make a mint. AMD filled the airwaves with press releases and staged anniversary parties as it declared itself the technological leader over Intel.

But Intel held on to its 92% market share in server chips. AMD was stuck at 6.5%. Opteron looked as if it was mostly hype.

AMD's real answer came in the form of a lawsuit filed Monday that accuses Intel of a litany of abuses, including using rebates to bribe computer makers into limiting their AMD purchases and threatening uncooperative customers with delayed shipments. "Tellingly, AMD's market share has not kept pace with its technical leadership. Intel's misconduct is the reason," the lawsuit stated.

The Opteron is featured throughout the lawsuit. AMD accuses Intel of paying IBM to stop marketing servers with Opteron chips. AMD also accuses Intel of interfering with Opteron's marketing and public relations by intimidating customers into skipping launch events.

Soon the courts will get to hear both versions of the story while Opteron, at least for now, collects a lot of dust.

Unfortunately for AMD, there is no good history of saving a product with lawsuits, as former Netscape executives can attest.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Git 2.2.1 Released To Fix Critical Security Issue

Today's Git vulnerability affects those using the Git client on case-insensitive file-systems. On case-insensitive platforms like Windows and OS X, committing to .Git/config could overwrite the user's .git/config and could lead to arbitrary code execution. Fortunately with most Phoronix readers out there running Linux, this isn't an issue thanks to case-sensitive file-systems. Read more

Ubuntu 15.04 Alpha 1 For Its Various Flavors

While Ubuntu itself no longer puts out alpha/beta releases in favor of just testing out the daily Live ISOs, the various Ubuntu flavors still participating in the traditional release process have done their first alpha releases this afternoon for Ubuntu 15.04. Read more

Robolinux 7.7.1 LXDE Runs Windows Apps with Stealth VM

Robolinux 7.7.1, a fast and easy-to-use Linux distribution based on Debian has just received a new desktop environment, LXDE, making this the third second flavor of the distribution. Read more

Jolla's Sailfish OS Update 10 Is Now Available

The tenth update to Jolla's Sailfish mobile operating system is now available. This update is version 1.1.1.26 and is codenamed Vaarainjärvi. This latest update to Jolla's Sailfish OS includes the device lock now supporting alpha-numeric codes, copy-paste support between Android and native Sailfish apps, Mail app improvements, new overlays for maps, search improvements, unification to the accounts framework, new MMS settings, UI improvements, and an assortment of other improvements. Read more