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OpenWrt 21.02 Comes with WPA3 Support Included by Default

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GNU
Linux

After about one and a half year of development OpenWrt 21.02 has been released with exciting new features.

OpenWrt is a free, open-source project for creating custom embedded operating systems for routers. It is a complete replacement for the vendor-supplied firmware of a wide range of wireless routers and non-network devices. OpenWrt is based on Linux kernel and it is the oldest open-source router firmware project.

Yesterday the OpenWrt community announced the first stable release of the OpenWrt 21.02 stable version series. The new release brings Linux kernel 5.4, gcc 8.4, glibc 2.33, and binutils 2.34, among many other updates and improvements.

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OpenWrt 21.02.0 released

  • OpenWrt 21.02.0 released

    Version 21.02.0 of the OpenWrt router distribution is out. "It incorporates over 5800 commits since branching the previous OpenWrt 19.07 release and has been under development for about one and a half year". Significant changes include WPA3 support by default, TLS support in opkg and in the LuCi interface, initial Distributed Switch Architecture support, new hardware support, and more. See the release notes for more information.

OpenWrt 21.02 released with WPA3, HTTPS, TLS enabled by default

  • OpenWrt 21.02 released with WPA3, HTTPS, TLS enabled by default

    OpenWrt 21.02 has just been released with higher security with WPA3, HTTPS & TLS enabled by default, as well as initial support for the Distributed Switch Architecture (DSA), the Linux standard for configurable Ethernet switches.

    OpenWrt is the most popular open-source Linux distribution for routers and entry-level Linux-capable embedded systems, and the latest release includes over 5800 commits since the release of OpenWrt 19.07 in January 2020.

    WPA3 was already supported in OpenWrt 19.07, but not enabled by default, OpenWrt 20.02 changes that, together with TLS thanks to trusted CA certificates from Mozilla. That means LuCi interface, wget, opkg package manager can all support HTTPS out-of-the-box. Note that HTTPS redirection can be disabled for LuCI in the configuration files. Another security change is that SELinux is now supported by OpenWrt, but not enabled by default.

    OpenWrt 21.02’s DSA implementation replaces the current swconfig system, but not all targets have been ported, so some are still using swconfig. Since the two solutions are much different, a system upgrade will not be able to convert an existing swconfig configuration to DSA configuration.

    The new release also updates the syntax of configuration files including board.json. OpenWrt 21.02 will still support the old convention and the LuCI interface can migrate your config automatically to the new syntax.

    Various packages have been updated with OpenWrt relying on Linux 5.4.143, busybox 1.33.1, gcc 8.4.0, and the operating system switched from mbedTLS to wolfSSL as the default SSL library. Both mbedTLS and OpenSSL can still be installed manually. New hardware targets have been added from realtek, Broadcom (bcm4908), and Rockchip RL33xx which should be good news for Rockchip RK3328 and RK3399 boards such NanoPi R2S, Rock Pi 4, Pine64 RockPro64, or which are already supported, but hopefully others like Orange Pi R1 Plus will be added to the list.

OpenWrt 21.02 Arrives With Linux Kernel 5.4 & WPA3 Support

  • OpenWrt 21.02 Arrives With Linux Kernel 5.4 & WPA3 Support

    The OpenWrt community announced the first stable update of their series, OpenWrt 21.02.

    In case you did not know, OpenWrt is a project that helps create custom operating systems for embedded devices.

    It enables users to openly customize their devices according to their networking needs, something that the stock router firmware doesn’t. Other than routers, OpenWrt can run on a variety of devices such as smartphones, residential gateways, and even 32 bit PCs!

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