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Free Software: Events, Stats, and More

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  • What I miss about open source conferences | Opensource.com

    A typical work year would involve my attending maybe six to eight conferences in person and speaking at quite a few of them. A few years ago, I stopped raiding random booths at the exhibitions usually associated with these for t-shirts for the simple reason that I had too many of them. That's not to say that I wouldn't accept one here or there if it was particularly nice, or an open source project which I esteemed particularly, for instance. Or ones which I thought my kids would like—they're not "cool" but are at least useful for sleepwear, apparently. I also picked up a lot of pens and enough notebooks to keep me going for a while.

    And then, at the beginning of 2020, the pandemic hit, I left San Francisco, where I'd been attending meetings co-located with RSA North America (my employer at the time made the somewhat prescient decision not to allow us to go to the main conference), and I've not attended any in-person conferences since.

    There are some good things about this, the most obvious being less travel, though, of late, my family has been dropping an increasing number of not-so-subtle hints about how it would be good if I let them alone for a few days so they can eat food I don't like (pizza and macaroni cheese, mainly) and watch films that I don't enjoy (largely, but not exclusively, romcoms on Disney+). The downsides are manifold. Having to buy my own t-shirts and notebooks, obviously, though it turns out that I'd squirreled away enough pens for the duration. It also turned out that the move to USB-C connectors hadn't sufficiently hit the conference swag industry by the end of 2019 for me to have enough of those to keep me going, so I've had to purchase some of those. That's the silly, minor stuff, though—what about areas where there's real impact?

  • Apache Software Foundation Saw $3M In Revenue, ~134M Changed Lines Of Code Last Year

    The Apache Software Foundation recently published their FY2021 report for their year-ended 30 April. Even with the ongoing pandemic, the Apache Software Foundation managed to raise more than $3M USD and enjoyed a host of software successes.

    On the coding front, the Apache Software Foundation during FY2021 saw 258k commits to its hosted projects that changed 134M lines of code by 3,058 committers. The ASF is up to having 200 project management committees and 351 Apache projects in total. There were 14 projects last year that graduated from the Apache Incubator status.

  • Open-source software starts with developers, but there are other important contributors, too. Who exactly? Good question

    Is Linus Torvalds important to open-source software? Of course. Guido van Rossum, who created the popular programming language Python? Sure! Michael "Monty" Widenius of MySQL fame? Certainly. OK, what about Robert Love? Eben Moglen? Or Jono Bacon?

    Who? Exactly. They latter three are, in order: the author of Linux in a Nutshell, arguably the most important Linux book; the leading open-source GPL attorney; and perhaps the top open-source community guru. Would open-source software exist without them? Yes. But, would it look the same? No. No it wouldn't.

    We've always known that open source is more than its developers. Open source is also the people who document it, popularise it, organise the communities that support it and, yes, lead the companies that monetise it.

    But, how do you measure their value? That's a good question without an obvious good answer.

    For programmers, it's relatively easy. Once you get rid of the insane idea that programming productivity could be measured by lines of code (LoC) per day, like so many factory workers making widgets, you can come up with reasonable metrics.

  • Storaji: An Open-Source Simple inventory management application

    There are many features that you will get from using open-source inventory and warehouse management projects on your company.

    Using an open-source project such as Storaji allows you to easily modify a work, integrate the work into a larger project or drive a new work based on the original and more.

    Storaji is an open source responsive inventory management system with the aim to help small-to-medium companies. This tool is simple tool that manage product inventory, orders, and more.

    The best thing here is that Storaji doesn’t charge any fee. It built with the trendiest web technologies and becoming.

    [...]

    The System required NodeJS 8, PHP 7, PHP Composer. It is licensed under MIT license.

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Redcore Linux Still Aims to Bring Gentoo Linux to the Masses, Now Ships with Linux 5.14

Over the past five years, Redcore Linux’s goal has always been to bring the power of the source-based Gentoo Linux operating system to the masses, offering users up-to-date and hardened live ISO images with the most recent KDE Plasma desktop environment and a carefully selected set of applications for office, multimedia, gaming, and Internet browsing needs. Read more

Ubuntu 21.04 and 20.04 LTS Users Get New Linux Kernel Security Update, Patch Now

Coming only three weeks after the previous kernel security update, the new one is currently only available for Ubuntu 21.04 (Hirsute Hippo) and Ubuntu 20.04.3 LTS (Focal Fossa) systems running the Linux 5.11 kernel series, and it’s available for all supported architectures and kernel flavors that Ubuntu supports. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare" Plasma Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare", the Plasma edition and it is amazing.

  • CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare" Plasma

    Today we are looking at the amazing CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare", KDE Plasma release. This is their first stable release and WOW, I am truly impressed. It comes with Linux Kernel 5.14, KDE Plasma 5.22, based on Arch, and uses about 1.2GB of ram when idling. Enjoy!

  • Pinephone Pro: Mobile Linux To The Next Level - Invidious

    I've been thinking of buying a pinephoen for a while and seemingly out of nowhere the pinephone pro has been announced so let's have a look at what it's like

  • Five of Tuesday’s ‘All Things Open’ Presentations We Wouldn’t Miss

    Yesterday — just in case you were looking for something to do — we told you about five talks on Monday’s All Things Open schedule that we were planning on watching online (which we did, and they were even better than expected). Today, we’re doing the same with ATO’s Tuesday schedule, because hey, that’s just the way we roll. You might have noticed yesterday that we left the keynotes off our list, which we’re also doing today. The way we look at it is that if we have to tell you that you need to watch the keynotes, there’s not much we can do for you.

  • Windows, macOS or Linux, which one to choose [Ed: Relatively shallow article]

    Linux made its name for being an extremely versatile operating system, equipping everything from minicomputers like the Raspberry Pi to datacenters in the cloud, through devices that are in our daily lives, such as smart TVs, routers, thermostats, and the like, without even being suspicious. But what about home and personal use? How does the penguin system fare? The main difference between Linux in relation to Windows and macOS is that it is an open-source system. Therefore, it can be modified and improved by anyone who wants to collaborate on the project or make their own distribution. It is due to this characteristic that we see the system being implemented for so many purposes.