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KDE Slimbook: the best way to run KDE

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How do you write a review of a laptop when you’re struggling to find truly negative things to say? This is rarely an issue – every laptop is a compromise – but with the KDE Slimbook, I feel like I’ve hit this particular problem for the first time. A luxury, for sure, but it makes writing this review a lot harder than it’s supposed to be.

First, let’s talk about Slimbook itself. Slimbook is a Linux OEM from Spain, founded in 2015, which sells various laptops and desktops with a variety of preinstalled Linux distributions to choose from (including options for no operating system, or Windows). A few years ago, Slimbook partnered with KDE to sell the KDE Slimbook – a Slimbook laptop with KDE Neon preinstalled, and the KDE logo engraved on the laptop’s lid. The current KDE Slimbook is – I think – the third generation, and the first to make the switch from Intel to AMD.

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5 Best Ways To Secure Your Linux System Distribution

There are many ways to secure your Linux system distribution. Today, cyber attacks and computer hacking can be prevented by bolstering security systems. By securing a Linux system, a computer is shielded from identity theft, data extraction, and other forms of malware. Different ways of securing a Linux system can teach users how to avoid spam, scams, and phishing campaigns. As a Linux developer, you should follow basic principles to increase privacy, security and stability. In this article, we’ll discuss the best ways you can secure your Linux system. Enable full disk encryption (FDE) to secure your Linux system. You should encrypt your entire hard disk regardless of which operating system you are using. This will ensure that your data remains secure if the device is stolen. First, take advantage of full disk encryption at install time if possible. By encrypting your hard disk, a criminal will be unable to extract your information without an FDE password. Encrypt your full disk so you don’t have to worry about temporary files, swap files, or other directories containing sensitive information. Furthermore, you will notice that encrypting your full disk allows your computer to function at a similar level of performance. Certainly, consider FDE as a cybersecurity tip to help Linux users protect their computers. Read more