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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • What I learned from Russian students: logging is important | Random thoughts of Peter 'CzP' Czanik

    I checked the logfiles of the servers I managed occasionally, but mostly only to check if the hard drives were showing any signs of failure. While browsing the logs for hard drive errors, I came across some suspicious login messages. Logins from previously not seen unknown IP addresses. I knew that the addresses were from campus, so I asked around. It turned out, that they belonged to the Russian students laboratory. And talking to the user it turned out, that he was unaware that his account was used also by someone else.

    The exact order of events is a kind of blurry, it was a quarter of a century ago. I started to check log messages not just for hard drive problems but also for security related events. I could see more and more logins from the Russian students laboratory. It was a kind of cat and mouse game, I was trying to keep unauthorized users out of the system.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by openSUSE (libaom and nextcloud), Oracle (cyrus-imapd, firefox, and thunderbird), Red Hat (kernel and kpatch-patch), Scientific Linux (firefox and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (apport).

  • Ubuntu Livepatch on-prem reduces downtime and unplanned work on enterprise environments!

    Canonical announces Ubuntu Livepatch on-prem, an enhancement to its Ubuntu Livepatch service enabling organisations to take control of their kernel livepatching policy. Designed for complex enterprise environments that follow their own patch rollout policy, Ubuntu Livepatch on-prem provides the basis for an efficient but fine-tuned continuous vulnerability management on private, hybrid, or public clouds. It provides a functional and productive experience to system administrators, or IT operations teams. The announcement represents the next phase in the Ubuntu Livepatch service targeting enterprise environments as organisations around the world adopt cybersecurity frameworks and requirements to tackle a constantly changing threat landscape.

  • Hackers develop Linux port of Cobalt Strike for new attacks | IT PRO

    The tool has been developed from scratch to avoid detection from malware scanners.

    According to a report published by cloud security firm Intezer Labs, researchers last month discovered a fully undetected ELF implementation of Cobalt Strike’s beacon. The malware used Cobalt Strike’s Command and Control (C2) protocol when communicating to its C2 server and has remote access capabilities such as uploading files, running shell commands, and writing to files.

    Cobalt Strike is a legitimate penetration testing tool used by security teams to discover vulnerabilities within their organization.

    Researchers warned that the malware is completely undetected in VirusTotal and was uploaded from Malaysia. Intezer researchers Avigayil Mechtinger, Ryan Robinson and Joakim Kennedy said that this Linux threat has been active in the wild since August, predominantly targeting telecom companies, government agencies, IT companies, financial institutions, and advisory companies around the world.

One more...

  • CERT NZ Releases Ransomware Protection Guide for Businesses [Ed: Deleting Microsoft Windows (click or open to execute) would be a good start]

    The New Zealand Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT NZ) has released a guide on ransomware protection for businesses. The guide includes a pair of helpful diagrams that outline different ransomware attack pathways and illustrate where relevant security controls can work to protect or stop an attack.

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More in Tux Machines

DXVK 1.9.2 Improves Pathfinder: Wrath of the Righteous, Need For Speed Heat, and Other Games

DXVK 1.9.2 is here almost two months after the DXVK 1.9.1 release and introduces more bug fixes to reduce overall CPU overhead in Direct3D 9 and address several issues, as well as to improve support for several Windows games that some of you might want to play on your favorite GNU/Linux distributions. Among these, there’s a fix for reflection rendering in Call of Cthulhu, a workaround for poor performance in the Crysis 3 and Homefront: The Revolution, improved gamma curve in GODS, a fix for incorrect rendering Fantasy Grounds, and a fix for blank screen in Paranormal Files. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Please Stop Closing Forums And Moving People To Discord

    A few days ago Eurogamer closed their forums, bringing to an end over 20 years of community discussion. The site explained the move like sites and companies always do (only a few are still using them), and it made sense the way it always does (that’s a lot of money for not much gain), but that doesn’t mean the process itself isn’t something that sucks.

  • Nokia has recommenced participation in the O-RAN Alliance

    The O-RAN Alliance said it became aware of concerns regarding some participants that may be subject to U.S. export regulations, and has been working with O-RAN participants to address these concerns. The O-RAN Board has approved changes to O-RAN participation documents and procedures. While it is up to each O-RAN participant to make their own evaluation of these changes, O-RAN is optimistic that the changes will address the concerns and facilitate O-RAN’s mission, the Alliance said.

  • Nokia and O-RAN: an unwavering commitment

    Nokia has long been a believer in – and champion of – open and interoperable technologies. We believe that Open RAN technology has the potential to enrich the mobile ecosystem with new solutions and business models, and an expanded multi-vendor ecosystem. This is what customers and consumers want – and it is something we are committed to seeing through.

  • Oil Has Multi-line Commands and String Literals

    In June's post Recent Progress on the Oil Language, I wrote that Oil has Python-like multi-line string literals, but enhanced like the Julia language.

    Here are examples from the Oil Language Tour.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • 5 DevSecOps myths, explained

    New ways of doing things tend to beget new myths and misunderstandings about those emerging methods. A common example: As newer work processes and cultures get popularized, people commonly begin to tout a single correct way to implement them. In all likelihood, though, there’s more than one “right” way to do it – and that’s true for DevSecOps, as it was with DevOps before it. Demystifying DevSecOps, then, is actually a meaningful (if not wholly necessary in some organizations) step toward a successful implementation. That’s because DevSecOps, like DevOps, is as much a matter of people and culture as anything else. As Red Hat associate principal solutions architect Mike Calizo wrote over at opensource.com, “DevSecOps encourages security practitioners to adapt and change their old existing security processes and procedures. This may sound easy, but changing processes, behavior, and culture is always difficult, especially in large environments.”

  • Red Hat's Upstream Contributions Are Making For A Great Fedora Workstation 35 - Phoronix

    Fedora Workstation 35 will hopefully be out at the end of October (currently the beta is running behind schedule) and when it does ship it's once again at the bleeding-edge of Linux features. Fedora Workstation 35 is shaping up to be another great release for those interested in a feature-rich desktop experience. Fedora Workstation 35 test builds have been working out great on the few systems I've tried so far in the lab. More Fedora Workstation 35 testing and benchmarks will be coming up in the weeks ahead. In anticipation of the upcoming Fedora 35 Beta, Red Hat's Christian Schaller once again published a new blog post outlining some of the big changes on the Fedora Workstation side for this six-month update.

  • Rajeesh K Nambiar: A new set of OpenType shaping rules for Malayalam script

    TLDR; research and development of a completely new OpenType layout rules for Malayalam traditional orthography. Writing OpenType shaping rules is hard. Writing OpenType shaping rules for advanced (complex) scripts is harder. Writing OpenType shaping rules without causing any undesired ligature formations is even harder.

  • The NeuroFedora Blog: Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 13 September 1300 UTC
  • Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 27 September 1300 UTC

Games: The Jackbox Party Pack 8, Valve, FlightGear, KeeperRL, and More

  • The Jackbox Party Pack 8 arrives on October 18 | GamingOnLinux

    It's back again with some new games to make you laugh at your friends through. The Jackbox Party Pack 8 is set to release on October 18 along with continued Linux support.

  • As Steam Deck ships to devs, Valve plans NEW console! - Invidious

    New DOTA2 leaks show that Valve are working on TWO NEW CONSOLES.

  • Laser Chess game Deflection is out now providing a fun new strategy game | GamingOnLinux

    Take down the enemy King with a great big laser, that's the aim of the game in Deflection. It's basically the original Laser Chess updated for modern platforms by Coreffect Interactive. A simple idea with you moving mirrors around that can bounce the laser, while also having different sides that are vulnerable to the enemy laser. Positioning and thinking ahead are the key to victory here and Coreffect Interactive have clearly put a lot of thought into it. It's another case of a game that's real easy to get into and understand, however becoming good at it is a whole different thing. It's more than that though as there's a few different pieces you get to use like portals to move the laser around and a disrupter to weaken pieces close to it too.

  • Free and open source flight sim FlightGear is working on VR support | GamingOnLinux

    It's currently at a stage where they consider it highly experimental, more of a proof-of-concept but if they get it all hooked up properly it could help aid other developers too since it's FOSS.

  • Open source dungeon builder KeeperRL adds a Dwarves faction in the latest big release | GamingOnLinux

    KeeperRL continues expanding as a mix of dungeon building, adventuring and RPG mechanics all blended together and now there's a playable Dwarves faction. Over 7 years of development has gone into this game so far and it just keeps getting better. Alpha 33 adds in not just a whole new faction but it also overhauls some existing systems. Some of what's new includes a special storage system with custom storage furniture for various equipment types, a new fog effect, new z-level enemies with progressing difficulty, crossbows got added, a reworked flanking/parry mechanic with visual indicators and hints, combat experience is now based on the number of unique kills, a new 'swamp' biome for some villains that was officially added from a mod, fast travel between z-levels in the turned-based mode and so much more. There's even a new intro.

  • Call of Saregnar is a nod to 90s party-based RPGs and it's on the way to Linux | GamingOnLinux

    Do you miss earlier party-based RPGs? Call of Saregnar is an in development title from Damjan Mozetič inspired by the likes of Betrayal at Krondor, TES: Daggerfall and Realms of Arkania. The developer explains that it's a game of exploration and investigation with an emphasis on story and characters, and that it "proudly ditches the cliches of the RPG genre and expects you to think". What makes it real interesting is that it blends together a low-poly 3D style with the characters made from shots of real-life actors. [...] On the status of Linux support, the developer made it clear on Twitter that it's already hooked up.