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Kernel: Seamless Update and Linux 5.15

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Linux
  • Intel Seamless Update: Intel Preparing For System Firmware Updates Without The Reboot - Phoronix

    "Intel Seamless Update" is a forthcoming feature for Intel platforms seemingly first being exposed by their new Linux kernel patches working on the functionality... Intel is working on being able to carry out system firmware upates such as UEFI updates but doing so at run-time and being able to avoid the reboot in the process.

  • Linux 5.15 update brings plenty of improvements for AMD hardware and the Steam Deck

    Linux 5.15 is out, and the new kernel is bringing a host of brand new updates for existing AMD CPUs and GPUs, even some that aren't out yet. While not the largest update, Ryzen and Radeon users will appreciate what it has to offer, and it could be especially interesting for AMD Van Gogh-powered devices like the future Valve Steam Deck.

  • Linux 5.15 Raises Its GCC Compiler Version Requirement - Phoronix

    While Linux 5.15-rc1 was released on Sunday with its many changes, landing on Monday was a late change to raise the baseline GCC version requirement for building the Linux kernel.

    The Linux kernel to now supported building on kernels as far back as GCC 4.9 while now it has been bumped to GCC 5.1. AArch64 already required at least GCC 5.1 while this bump affects all other architectures.

Intel Seamless Updates could pave the way for firmware...

Intel Seamless Update to enable BIOS/UEFI firmware updates...

  • Intel Seamless Update to enable BIOS/UEFI firmware updates without a reboot

    Updating the BIOS/UEFI binary usually requires a reboot, but Intel is working on changing that, at least on Linux servers for now, with the Intel Seamless Update aiming to carry out system firmware updates (e.g. UEFI) at run-time without having to reboot, a bit like what Canonical does with the Ubuntu Livepatch service, but at a lower level in the software stack.

    Intel submitted a patch that “Introduces Platform Firmware Runtime Update and Telemetry drivers” to the Linux kernel mailing list a couple of days ago with the description reading in part:

    High Service Level Agreements (SLAs) requires that the system runs without service interruptions. Generally, system firmware provides runtime services such as RAS (Reliability, Availability and Serviceability) features, UEFI runtime services and ACPI services. Currently if there is any firmware code changes in these code area, the system firmware update and reboot is required. Example of bug fix could be wrong register size or location of the register. This means customer services are not available during the firmware upgrade, which could approach several minutes, resulting in not able to meet SLAs.

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