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First Look: Ubuntu 21.10 Default Wallpaper Revealed

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Ubuntu

As expected, the new background doesn’t deviate too far from the traditional template and continues the trend of putting a large animal mascot face at the center of a purple and orange gradient...

You may notice that the mascot artwork (of the Indri itself) is less stylised than in previous releases.

We’ve had oodles of origami-inspired icons (Yakkety Yak, Zesty Zapus); ample angular and/or geometric motifs (Groovy Gorilla, Disco Dingo); and a clutch of companions composed entirely of intersecting concentric rings (Bionic Beaver, Cosmic Cuttlefish, Eoan Ermine, Hirsute Hippo).

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This Is Ubuntu 21.10?s New Wallpaper

Ubuntu Linux 21.10 'Impish Indri' official wallpapers

  • Ubuntu Linux 21.10 'Impish Indri' official wallpapers now available for download

    The next new version of Ubuntu will be designated as 21.10. Why? Well, the versioning scheme of that Linux-based operating system uses a two digit year followed by a period and then a two digit month (yy.mm). With October being the 10th month, Ubuntu Linux 21.10 is merely weeks away.

    Besides knowing the version number of the next Ubuntu release, we also know the code-name -- "Impish Indri." We shared that detail with you back in April of this year. And now, the official artwork of Ubuntu Linux 21.10 "Impish Indri" becomes available for download.

    You can view the new artwork in wallpaper form at the top of this page -- there are a total of four. As you can see, two of them feature a cartoon indri mascot (a type of lemur), one in grey and the other using the official Ubuntu colors. The other two wallpapers are essentially the same, but without the animal in the middle. The Ubuntu developers share proper download links here.

Download official wallpaper for Ubuntu Linux 21.10 Impish Indri

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