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Canonical to Push More Snaps in Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu to Make Firefox Snap Default in 21.10

    Ubuntu plans to make the Firefox Snap the default version for new installations of Ubuntu 21.10.

    A feature freeze exception (FFE) filed by Canonical’s Olivier Tilloy will replace the Firefox .deb package in the Ubuntu ‘seed’ with the Snap version. He writes: “Per Canonical’s distribution agreement with Mozilla, we’re making the snap the default installation of firefox on desktop ISOs starting with Ubuntu 21.10.”

    Firefox is currently distributed via the Ubuntu repos as a deb package. If this feature freeze request is granted users who install Ubuntu 21.10 next month will find the official Snap version of the vaunted web browser there, in its place.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Snap Performance Skunk Works – Ensuring speed and consistency for snaps

    Snaps are used on desktop machines, servers and IoT devices. However, it’s the first group that draws the most attention and scrutiny. Due to the graphic nature of desktop applications, users are often more attuned to potential problems and issues that may arise in the desktop space than with command-line tools or software running in the background.

    Application startup time is one of the common topics of discussion in the Snapcraft forums, as well as the wider Web. The standalone, confined nature of snaps means that their startup procedure differs from the classic Linux programs (like those installed via Deb or RPM files). Often, this can translate into longer startup times, which are perceived negatively. Over the years, we have talked about the various mechanisms and methods introduced into the snaps ecosystem, designed to provide performance benefits: font cache improvements, compression algorithm change, and others. Now, we want to give you a glimpse of a Skunk Works* operation inside Canonical, with focus on snaps and startup performance.

Hot Topic: Ubuntu to Make Firefox Snap Default in 21.10

  • Hot Topic: Ubuntu to Make Firefox Snap Default in 21.10

    A feature freeze exception (FFE) filed by Canonical’s Olivier Tilloy will replace the Firefox .deb package in the Ubuntu ‘seed’ with the Snap version. He writes: “Per Canonical’s distribution agreement with Mozilla, we’re making the snap the default installation of firefox on desktop ISOs starting with Ubuntu 21.10.”

    Firefox is currently distributed via the Ubuntu repos as a deb package. If this feature freeze request is granted users who install Ubuntu 21.10 next month will find the official Snap version of the vaunted web browser there, in its place.

After Chromium, Ubuntu Now Converts Firefox to Snap by Default

  • After Chromium, Ubuntu Now Converts Firefox to Snap by Default

    One of the major and controversial changes in the upcoming Ubuntu 21.10 is the conversion of Firefox from deb to snap.

    Yes, you heard it right. The default Firefox will be a Snap application, not the regular DEB version.

    As spotted by OMG! Ubuntu, this is done as per an agreement between Mozilla and Canonical (Ubuntu’s parent company).

Firefox could come to Ubuntu 21.10 in Snap format

  • Firefox could come to Ubuntu 21.10 in Snap format instead of Deb

    Canonical is willing to convert Snap, at least, into the new package format for Ubuntu applications (and if possible for the rest of the distributions ), so after the rivers of ink that ran through the Chromium case, now we comes a “sequel” with Firefox, which in Ubuntu 21.10 indicates that it will be served in Snap format .

Ubuntu 21.10 makes Firefox as a Snap

  • Ubuntu 21.10 makes Firefox as a Snap

    Actually, Ubuntu 21.10 “Impish Indri”, the release of which is scheduled for October 14th, is already in the Feature Freeze. Last week, however, an application was received for an exception that provides for the standard installation of Firefox in consultation with Mozilla in Snap format, as is already the case with Google’s Chromium browser.

    The measure, which has now been approved, should offer enough time to correct errors until Firefox as a snap becomes the standard for the desktop images of the next LTS version of Ubuntu in spring 2022. The snap package is to be created for the architectures amd64, armhf and arm64 . It is to be maintained by Mozilla and Canonical’s desktop team and published by Mozilla.

    The measure affects users who install Ubuntu 21.10 or update to this version. This does not (yet) affect the other versions of Ubuntu with desktop environments that differ from GNOME. Linux Mint users should also be spared the change, as the Mint developers had already introduced the not Chromium snap . As can be seen in the corresponding blog entry on Ubuntu, the idea for Firefox as a snap came from Mozilla, which see the following advantages...

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