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Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS Released with BootHole Patches, Latest Security Updates

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Ubuntu

Released back in April 26th, 2018, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS was supposed to get only five point releases, up to Ubuntu 18.04.5 LTS, but since it’s supported until April 2023, Canonical decided to publish another point release that include patches for some serious security vulnerabilities affecting previous point releases.

As such, Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS is here as the sixth point release to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series with mitigations against the infamous BootHole security vulnerability discovered in the GRUB2 bootloader, which allows attackers to bypass UEFI Secure Boot.

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Ubuntu 18.04.6 Update Available to Download with Security fixes

The Six Point Release Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS is Out!

  • The Six Point Release Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS is Out!

    The Ubuntu team announced the six point release for Ubuntu 18.04 today for the Desktop and Server.

    Ubuntu 18.04.6 refreshed the disc images for the amd64 and arm64 architecture, re-enabling the usage on Secure Boot enabled systems due to the key revocation related to the BootHole vulnerability.

The Six Point Release Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS is Out!

  • The Six Point Release Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS is Out!

    The Ubuntu team announced the six point release for Ubuntu 18.04 today for the Desktop and Server.

    Ubuntu 18.04.6 refreshed the disc images for the amd64 and arm64 architecture, re-enabling the usage on Secure Boot enabled systems due to the key revocation related to the BootHole vulnerability.

Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS Released To Correct Broken Install Media

  • Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS Released To Correct Broken Install Media

    The unplanned Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS release is available today that was made on short notice for addressing unbootable media with Ubuntu 18.04.5.

    This extra Ubuntu 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" LTS point release stems from the install media breaking due to key revocation. The issue stems from the BootHole vulnerability and the keys used by Ubuntu having been revoked and thus needing to issue Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS with new keys.

Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS released

  • Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS released

    The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS (Long-Term Support) for its Desktop and Server products.

    Unlike previous point releases, 18.04.6 is a refresh of the amd64 and arm64 installer media after the key revocation related to the BootHole vulnerability, re-enabling their usage on Secure Boot enabled systems. More detailed information can be found here:

    https://ubuntu.com/blog/grub2-secure-boot-bypass-2021

    Many other security updates for additional high-impact bug fixes are also included, with a focus on maintaining stability and compatibility with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    Maintenance updates will be provided for 5 years for Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Cloud, and Ubuntu Base.

Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS Released with Critical Security Fix

  • Ubuntu 18.04.6 LTS Released with Critical Security Fix

    This (unplanned) point release arrives with one key — pun intended — purpose: to make Ubuntu 18.04 LTS bootable again on Secure Boot-enabled systems.

    “Unlike previous point releases, 18.04.6 is a refresh of the amd64 and arm64 installer media after the key revocation related to the BootHole vulnerability, re-enabling their usage on Secure Boot enabled systems,” writes Canonical’s Łukasz Zemczak explains in a release announcement.

It's Ubuntu

Canonical announces new point releases - Ubuntu 20.04.3....

  • Canonical announces new point releases - Ubuntu 20.04.3 and 18.04.6

    Canonical have released both the third point release of Ubuntu 20.04 Long-Term Support (LTS) as Ubuntu 20.04.3 and an unexpected six point release of Ubuntu 18.04 Long-Term Support (LTS) as Ubuntu 18.04.6 as a result of GRUB2 Secure Boot Bypass 2021.

    I’ve respun the desktop ISOs using my ‘isorespin.sh‘ script and created ISOs suitable for Intel Atom and Intel Apollo Lake devices:

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Stable Kernels: 5.14.13, 5.10.74, 5.4.154, 4.19.212, 4.14.251, 4.9.287, and 4.4.289

I'm announcing the release of the 5.14.13 kernel.

All users of the 5.14 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.14.y git tree can be found at:
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