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Arduino Projects and Hacks

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Hardware
  • RoboTray is a Secret Tea Butler

    If [samsungite] has any more Arduinos lying around, he might appreciate this tea inventory tracker.

  • Taking A Deep Dive Into SPI | Hackaday

    With the prevalence of libraries, it has never been easier to communicate with hundreds of different sensors, displays, and submodules. But what is really happening when you type SPI.begin() into the Arduino IDE? In his most recent video, [Ben Eater] explores the Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) and how it really works.

    Most Hackaday readers probably know [Ben] from his breadboard-based computers, such as the 6502 build we featured in 2019. Since then he has been hard at work, adding new and interesting additions to his breadboard computer, as well as diving into different communication protocols to better understand and implement them. For this video, [Ben] set the goal of connecting the BME280, a common pressure, temperature, and humidity sensor with an SPI interface, to his breadboard 6502 computer. Along the way, [Ben] discusses how exactly SPI works, and why there is so much conflicting nomenclature and operations when looking at different SPI devices.

  • TinySewer is a Portenta-powered camera module for sewer faults detection | Arduino Blog

    We all interact with the sewer system at multiple points throughout the day, and having it fail can lead to catastrophic results. Every year in the United States alone, an estimated 23,000 to 75,000 sewer pipe failures are reported, which means billions of gallons of untreated and hazardous waste is released into the environment. But rather than having a person constantly inspect the system on location, Huy Mai came up with a way to use computer vision in conjunction with embedded machine learning to automatically detect when a defect has occurred.

  • Arduino Cloud Widgets and Data Downloads Get an Overhaul

    Arduino Cloud?s dashboards and widgets are some of its most popular features. It?s what turns the Cloud into your ultimate control center for all kinds of projects, from home automation to industrial monitoring.

    We?re constantly looking for ways to improve the user experience, and we?ve just rolled out some small, but very important tweaks. Combined with the new historical data download process, your Arduino Cloud experience will now be even smoother.

More for today

  • Handy machine cuts heat shrink tubing to length | Arduino Blog

    Solder joints on PCBs don’t usually require extra protection, but loose wires are a different story. Because they can move around and touch each other or the enclosure, you need to protect the bare wire from shorts. Most people use either electrical tape or heat shrink tubing for the job. But cutting heat shrink tubing to length can be a time-consuming process if you have many wires to protect. That’s why Mr Innovative used an Arduino to build this handy machine that cuts heat shrink tubing automatically.

    Mr Innovative built similar machines in the past, including one that feeds four different wire spools and cuts them to desired lengths. This machine is similar, but works with a single spool of heat shrink tubing. The user inserts one end of the tubing into the machine, sets the length via a touchscreen interface, and the machine takes care of the rest. It will continue to snip off sections of tubing, all of the same length, until it runs out of heat shrink to work with.

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More in Tux Machines

Stable Kernels: 5.14.13, 5.10.74, 5.4.154, 4.19.212, 4.14.251, 4.9.287, and 4.4.289

I'm announcing the release of the 5.14.13 kernel.

All users of the 5.14 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.14.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.14.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h
Read more Also: Linux 5.10.74 Linux 5.4.154 Linux 4.19.212 Linux 4.14.251 Linux 4.9.287 Linux 4.4.289

Android Leftovers

Review: Auxtral 3

At the beginning of this review I mentioned Auxtral reminded me of Linux Mint Debian Edition. The theme, the Cinnamon desktop, and general look of the project certainly held that first impression. However, the default applications and tools (apart from the Cinnamon desktop and command line utilities) felt quite a bit different. Linux Mint has been around for several years and has earned a reputation for being beginner friendly, polished, and shipping with a lot of top-notch open source applications. Auxtral appears to have a similar approach - similar base distribution, the same desktop environments, and a similar look. However, Auxtral does have its own personality under the surface. It ships with a quite different collection of applications, sometimes using less popular items (Brave in place of Firefox, SMPlayer instead of VLC, etc.) It has also gone its own way with software updates, preferring classic tools like APT and Synaptic over Mint's update manager. Auxtral is off to a good start. This was my first time trying the distribution and the experience was mostly positive. The operating system is easy to install, offers multiple desktop environments, and walks a pretty good line between hand holding and staying out of the way. The application menu is uncluttered while including enough programs to be useful. Some of those programs are a bit more obscure or less beginner friendly than what you might find in Linux Mint, but otherwise it's a good collection. Virtually everything worked and worked smoothly. I was unpleasantly surprised by this distribution's memory usage, most projects consume about half as much RAM, but otherwise I liked what Auxtral had to offer. I might not recommended it to complete beginners, especially since the project does not appear to have any documentation or support options of its own, but for someone who doesn't mind a little command line work or who likes the idea of an easy to setup distribution that combines Debian with the Cinnamon (or Xfce desktop) this seems like a good option. Read more

31 Best Linux Performance Monitoring Tools

Linux Performance Monitoring tools are the tools that allow you to keep track of your Linux system's resources and storage usage, as well as the state of your network. The tools can be used to troubleshoot and debug Linux System Performance issues. In this tutorial, we will learn the best tools for Linux performance monitoring and troubleshooting. Read more