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Games: IPv6 Support on the PlayStation 5, SDL 2.0.16, VR on Linux

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Gaming
  • IPv6 Support on the PlayStation 5

    The PS5 does support IPv6, and the Netflix app proves that IPv6 connectivity is available for use. Apart from Netflix, though, there is not much use of IPv6. That goes both for the system software and its bundled apps, as well as for third-party apps and games.

  • SDL Still Has A Number Of Issues To Address Before Defaulting To Wayland - Phoronix

    The recently released SDL 2.0.16 brought much-improved Wayland support but it's still not quite good enough yet to have it be the default over the SDL X11 path. However, developers continue working in that direction to eventually use it by default.

    Well known Linux game porter Ethan Lee presented at this week's X.org Developers Conference (XDC2021) with the ongoing work to bring SDL's Wayland support up to parity with X11 that it can be the default.

  • VR on Linux: A Growing Market?

    Here’s another look at the survey conducted back in April 2021 – this time we will check the answers from all respondents regarding VR on Linux.

    First, let’s have a look at how widespread is VR among the respondents...

    As expected, the majority of users have actually never tried VR. However, the number of owners of PC VR equipment is much higher than I had anticipated. More than 13% is a huge number, relative to the usual market of VR as we know currently. As usual the same disclaimer apply as per the previous survey analysis (this sample is potentially not representative of Linux gamers at large, etc…) but there are still many things to learn from it.

    [...]

    It’s not very surprising that the large majority has no such intent. But still, about 15.8% say they would be somewhat likely or very likely to purchase such VR equipment. Even if only half of those actually pulls the trigger, that’s still something like a 8% growth year on year. Not very fast, but still healthy in terms of market development. It’s consistent with what we have been observing so far with VR: sales increase year after year, but there’s no explosion – nothing like how smartphones took off, if we were to take a benchmark.

    I think this all says that VR is potentially great, but for numerous reasons, it’s not yet ready to go full mainstream. Half Life: Alyx may be the exception that proves the rule: pretty much everyone who played it considered it a game-changer, but there’s only one game like that, and this is from Valve after spending years experimenting with what VR could bring. Maybe every game, ten years from now, will be as good or better than Alyx in VR, but until more extraordinary titles come out, adoption will be on a slow pace.

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