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Linux 5.15-rc2

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Linux

So I've spent a fair amount of this week trying to sort out all the
odd warnings, and I want to particularly thank Guenter Roeck for his
work on tracking where the build failures due to -Werror come from.

Is it done? No. But on the whole I'm feeling fairly good about this
all, even if it has meant that I've been looking at some really odd
and grotty code. Who knew I'd still worry about some odd EISA driver
on alpha, after all these years? A slight change of pace ;)

The most annoying thing is probably the "fix one odd corner case,
three others rear their ugly heads". But I remain convinced that it's
all for a good cause, and that we really do want to have a clean build
even for the crazy odd cases.

We'll get there.

Anyway, I hope this release will turn more normal soon - but the rc2
week tends to be fairly quiet for me, so the fact that I then ended up
looking at reports of odd warnings-turned-errors this week wasn't too
bad.

There's obviously other fixes in here too, only a small subset of the
shortlog below is due to the warning fixes, even if that's what I've
personally been most involved with.

Go test, and keep the reports coming,

                Linus

Read more

Also of note: [GIT pull] locking/urgent for v5.15-rc2

Linux 5.15-rc2 Released With Many Fixes, Addressing Issues...

  • Linux 5.15-rc2 Released With Many Fixes, Addressing Issues Raised By "-Werror"

    Linux 5.15-rc2 is now available as the latest weekly release candidate for this next version of the Linux kernel. Linux 5.15 in turn should be out as stable around the start of November.

    Being just one week past the end of the merge window, Linux 5.15-rc2 has seen many fixes land in the past week. Among the post-merge-window items catching my eye this week were bumping the GCC version requirement for the baseline compiler version supported, Linux 5.15 now being slightly less broken for the DEC Alpha "Jensen" system, and an important fix for the KSMBD in-kernel SMB3 file server.

Simon Sharwood continues to troll Torvalds

  • -Werror pain persists as Linus Torvalds issues Linux 5.15rc2 [Ed: Simon Sharwood continues to troll Torvalds. Compare the promotional language used to promote Microsoft vapourware like Vista Service Pack '11' and all those negative headlines about Linux.]

    Linus Torvalds has revealed that winding back the decision to default to -Werror – and therefore make all warnings into errors – has made for another messy week of work on the Linux kernel.

    "So I've spent a fair amount of this week trying to sort out all the odd warnings, and I want to particularly thank Guenter Roeck for his work on tracking where the build failures due to -Werror come from," Torvalds wrote in his weekly missive about the state of kernel development.

    "Is it done?" he asked rhetorically. "No. But on the whole I'm feeling fairly good about this all, even if it has meant that I've been looking at some really odd and grotty code. Who knew I'd still worry about some odd EISA driver on alpha, after all these years? A slight change of pace ;)"

Kernel prepatch 5.15-rc2

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Stable Kernels: 5.14.13, 5.10.74, 5.4.154, 4.19.212, 4.14.251, 4.9.287, and 4.4.289

I'm announcing the release of the 5.14.13 kernel.

All users of the 5.14 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.14.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.14.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h
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