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Chrome, Flow, and Chromium

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  • 25 Best Chrome Flags You Should Enable To Optimize Your Browsing

    Google Chrome has become the most popular web browser because of its simplicity and speed. Besides, it has lots of excellent features, including some hidden features that boost your browsing experience. Chrome flags are the hidden feature tools that tweak your Chrome UI and performance by changing Chrome settings. This is basically an experimental feature tested on Chrome OS, but it is available in the trial. If you want to learn more techniques about boosting your browsing experience, you need to follow our complete guidelines to enable a flag.

    However, no flag ensures stable performance. Moreover, finding bugs is a widespread occurrence in a flag. Besides, it would be best if you considered that flags are not tested on online security. So it takes a little bit of risk of using a flag. If you want to experience the cutting edge of Chrome by taking small risks, let’s talk with the 25 best Chrome flags.

  • Crank up the volume on that Pixies album: Time to exercise your Raspberry Pi with an... alternative browser

    While browser-makers squabble over standards, privacy and exactly what their User-Agent string should say, Ekioh's clean-room browser, Flow, has continued to quietly advance.

    The Register last looked at Flow over Christmas 2020 and we came away impressed with the work in progress, not least its speed and the lack of data slurpage. There were, however, problems, one of which was that Google's web applications were not entirely happy.

    In a lengthy blog post Ekioh's CEO, Piers Wombwell, explained the hoops that need to be jumped through in order to persuade Google Docs to run acceptably. While a canvas-based approach is inbound, getting the current incarnation up and running necessitated some head-scratching from the Flow team and demanded fixes. Sure – Google Docs seemed to load OK, although there was no word-wrap. But could you type into it? Nope.

  • Another attempt to compile Chromium [Ed: Web browsers have become overly bloated crap that takes away freedom, even when some code is available and liberally licensed]

    Over the years, I have made a few attempts to compile Chromium. One of those, in 2019, I posted about it:

    https://bkhome.org/news/201910/attempted-to-compile-chromium.html

    Yesterday, thought would try again. Tried and tried to download the source from the Chromium project on github, but it kept failing. The download is huge, over 1GB, and when it failed, when unable to continue, a restart from the beginning is required. This is the case when using gn "fetch --nohooks --no-history chromium" or when using wget -- in both cases, cannot continue from the point of failure.

    My contract with Vodafone is 40GB per month (on my phone), a fixed price with unlimited downloads -- but it drops to a considerably slower speed when exceed 40GB. So don't want to have too many 1GB download failures.

    So I downloaded the source from the Arch Linux repo, which was a 991MB tarball, no problem downloading. Version 93.0.4577.82.

Testing Chrome and Chrome 94 Released

  • Testing Chrome version 100 for fun and profit (but mostly fun I guess)

    Great news readers, my self-imposed 6 month cooldown on writing amazing blog posts has expired.

    My pal Ali just added a flag to Chromium to allow you to test sites while sending a User-Agent string that claims to be version 100 (should be in version 96+, that’s in the latest Canary if you download or update today)...

  • Stable Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 94 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux.Chrome 94 is also promoted to our new extended stable channel for Windows and Mac. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.

    Chrome 94.0.4606.54 contains a number of fixes and improvements -- a list of changes is available in the log. Watch out for upcoming Chrome and Chromium blog posts about new features and big efforts delivered in 94.

  • Chrome 94 Released With WebGPU For Testing, WebCodecs API Now Official

    Chrome 94 is available today as another exciting update for Google's web browser.

    Personally exciting me the most with Chrome 94 is WebGPU now as an origin trial for testing as the next-gen web graphics API alternative to WebGL. WebGPU allows for mapping to Vulkan, Direct3D, or Metal depending upon the platform. WebGPU is designed for today's modern graphics needs in the web.

    Chrome 94 is also exciting for WebCodecs API for being promoted now past its prior origin trial. WebCodecs is the low-level codec API around audio/video encoding and decoding along with raw video frame handling and more. WebCodecs API handling is intended to be more efficient than JavaScript or WebAssembly codec implementations.

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