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Graphics: X.Org Server 21.1 RC1, AMDGPU Linux Driver, and Xwayland Concern

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • X.Org Server 21.1 RC1 Released With VRR Support For Modesetting Driver, Other Features - Phoronix

    More than three years after X.Org Server 1.20 was released, it's set to finally be succeeded soon by X.Org Server 21.1 under its new versioning scheme. Out today is the X.org Server 21.1 release candidate.

    X.Org Server 21.1 is finally coming to light after being organized by new X.Org Server release manager volunteer Povilas Kanapickas. Even this new 21.1 release planning is running a few weeks late due to lingering changes to be moved. Rather than RC1 at the end of August, it's now coming at the end of September, but in any case it's looking like the official xorg-server 21.1.0 release will be out this year.

  • xorg-server 21.0.99.901

    This is the first release candidate of Xorg 21.1.0 release.

  • AMDGPU Linux Driver To Overhaul Its Approach To Device Enumeration - Phoronix

    AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver engineers are working to overhaul how the initial driver loading with device enumeration happens to ultimately make it more robust. In the process though PCI IDs become less important and in turn less of an avenue for exposing possible indicators of new graphics cards.

    A set of 66 patches were sent out today that alter more than two thousand lines of code. The change is ultimately more about having the device enumeration and discovery of supported IP/hardware blocks rather than being tied explicitly to PCI device IDs. All recent AMD GPUs do contain an "IP discovery table" for noting the different graphics, video encode/decode, and other blocks on the hardware -- the AMDGPU kernel driver would basically use that for determining its code paths and what is supported, etc.

  • Peter Hutterer: An Xorg release without Xwayland

    And it's a release without Xwayland.

    And... wait, what?

    Let's unwind this a bit, and ideally you should come away with a better understanding of Xorg vs Xwayland, and possibly even Wayland itself.
    Heads up: if you are familiar with X, the below is simplified to the point it hurts. Sorry about that, but as an X developer you're probably good at coping with pain.

    Let's go back to the 1980s, when fashion was weird and there were still reasons to be optimistic about the future. Because this is a thought exercise, we go back with full hindsight 20/20 vision and, ideally, the winning Lotto numbers in case we have some time for some self-indulgence.

By Microsoft Tim

  • More than three years after last release, X.Org Server 21.1.0 RC1 appears

    More than three years after X.Org Server 1.20, released in May 2018, a release candidate for 21.1.0 has been posted.

    The Linux display server remains widely used despite the introduction of Wayland, first released in 2012 and intended to replace X.

    The future of the software, in terms of significant new releases, was in doubt when project owner Adam Jackson declared the project "abandoned" last year, but Lithuanian developer Povilas Kanapickas (who formerly worked on the Unity game engine) stepped up and said:

    "There are new features in the Xorg DDX that I would like to see released, so I'm volunteering to do the releasing work."

X.org Server 21.1.0 RC Build Available for Test

  • X.org Server 21.1.0 RC Build Available for Test

    The last full-time release of the X.org server took place in 2018 with version 1.20. With the trend towards Wayland, Red Hat is no longer interested in taking over release management for X.org as it used to be. For a long time no other organization or a developer could be found for the task.

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