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GNOME 41 Desktop Environment Officially Released, This Is What’s New

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GNOME

Six months in development, GNOME 41 is here as a hefty update and the first major release after GNOME 40 with new features like a new power mode setting in the Power settings panel of the GNOME Control Center called Performance, which will be available on hardware that supports this feature. The Performance mode increases CPU performance to allow your apps and activities to run faster.

Also new in the GNOME Control Center is a Multitasking settings panel that gives you control over window management and workspace multitasking options like the Activities hot corner, Active Screen Edges, the ability to show workspaces on all displays, choose between dynamic or fixed workspaces, and restrict app switching to the current workspace when using the Super+Tab keyboard shortcut.

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GNOME 41 Released with New Settings, Power Savings, and More

  • GNOME 41 Released with New Settings, Power Savings, and More

    As with most GNOME desktop updates, GNOME 41 is packed with an assortment of new features, user interface tweaks, and performance improvements.

    GNOME says that “[…] with these changes, GNOME is smarter, more flexible, and offers a richer and more engaging experience than ever before.”

    Source code for the latest release is available to download from the GNOME website from today.

    However, most Linux users will want to wait for their distro maintainers to package it up and push it out to them.

    On rolling release Linux distros (like Arch) this will be relatively soon. On fixed-release distros (like Ubuntu) it’ll be …sometime in the future.

Original and more: GNOME 41 released!

  • GNOME 41 released!
    The GNOME Project is proud to announce the release of GNOME 41.
    
    Highlights in this release include improvements to the Software app,
    new multitasking settings and enhanced power management. Beyond that,
    there is a new Connections application, a refreshed Music application,
    performance improvements from the compositor to the toolkit, and much
    more.
    
    To learn more about the changes in GNOME 41, you can read the release
    notes:
    
     https://help.gnome.org/misc/release-notes/41.0/
    
    GNOME 41 will be available shortly in many distributions. If you want
    to try it today, you can look for the imminent Fedora 35 beta or the
    openSUSE nightly live images which both include GNOME 41.
    
     https://www.gnome.org/getting-gnome/
     https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/GNOME:/Medias/images/iso/
    
    We are also providing our own installer images for debugging and testing
    features. These images are meant for installation in a vm and require
    GNOME Boxes with UEFI support. We suggest getting Boxes from flathub.
    
     https://download.gnome.org/gnomeos/41.0/gnome_os_installer_41.0.iso
     
    If you are interested in building applications for GNOME 41, look for the
    GNOME 41 Flatpak SDK, which is available in the www.flathub.org repository.
    
    This six-month effort wouldn't have been possible without the whole GNOME
    community, made of contributors and friends from all around the world:
    developers, designers, documentation writers, usability and accessibility
    specialists, translators, maintainers, students, system administrators,
    companies, artists, testers and last, but not least, our users.
    
    GNOME would not exist without all of you. Thank you to everyone!
    
    Our next release, GNOME 42, is planned for March 2022. Until then,
    enjoy GNOME 41.
    
    The GNOME Release Team
    
  • GNOME 41 Released With Wayland Improvements, More Performance Tuning

    GNOME 41 is out as the latest half-year update to this open-source desktop environment.

GNOME 41 released, by Liam Dawe

  • GNOME 41 released with performance enhanced, new power modes, store improvements | GamingOnLinux

    Another 6 months of development later and GNOME 41 is out with plenty of enhancements for GNOME desktop fans.

    "The most notable changes this in release include an improved Software app, new multitasking settings, and enhanced power management features. With these changes, GNOME is smarter, more flexible, and offers a richer and more engaging experience than ever before." - GNOME Team

    You will find new selectable power modes between Balanced (the default), Performance and Power Save which can be easily changed using the System Status menu. Meanwhile GNOME Software went through a small overhaul and they say almost every part of it has been improved. Performance is another key point and focus, with many efficiency improvements making it in so it will all feel more responsive (on Wayland). There's also improvements for multitouch, GTK 4 has a new OpenGL renderer which "provides faster rendering and reduced power consumption" and the window manager Mutter got cleaned up for "long-term maintainability and efficiency"

GNOME 41 Linux desktop environment arrives

  • GNOME 41 Linux desktop environment arrives

    There are many great desktop environments for Linux, such as Cinnamon, KDE Plasma, and MATE to name a few. With that said, only one can be the best, and that is obviously GNOME. I mean, look, there's a reason Canonical chose it as the default DE for Ubuntu -- it is just that good.

    If you are a GNOME fan, I have some extremely exciting news. You see, as of today, GNOME 41 is officially here! There are many new changes, such as enhanced multitasking settings and the inclusion of a new remote desktop client called "Connections." Most importantly, however, the developers promise GNOME 41 includes noticeable performance improvements, particularly for those using Wayland.

LWN and New Video

GNOME 41 Comes with Some Small but Very Useful Features

  • GNOME 41 Comes with Some Small but Very Useful Features

    GNOME 41 is now out and while it doesn’t change as many things as GNOME 40 did, there is still a lot of stuff to talk about.

    GNOME 41 is the second release to use GNOME’s new version numbering scheme. This replaced the old odd point release approach with a simpler, single integer. For your information the next GNOME 42 release is planned for March 2022.

    Here are some of the big additions in GNOME 41.

GNOME 41 Released: The Most Popular Linux Desktop Environment...

Another new video

From "itsubuntu"

  • GNOME 41 Released, Available In 38 Languages | Itsubuntu.com

    GNOME 41 is now officially available for the public use and is available for download from the website of GNOME. GNOME 41 is loaded with tons of new features, improvements and tweaks. GNOME 41 is the second release to use GNOME’s new version numbering scheme. The next release, version 42, is planned for March 2022. GNOME 41 is available in 38 languages. You can also see the number of smaller enhancements.

GNOME 41 Desktop Environment Released, Download Now

  • GNOME 41 Desktop Environment Released, Download Now

    GNOME 41 Desktop Environment Released, Download Now, After six months of development represented by the release of desktop environments GNOME 41 . For a quick assessment of the capabilities of GNOME 41, specialized live builds based on openSUSE and an installation image prepared as part of the GNOME OS initiative are offered . GNOME 41 is also included in the experimental build of Fedora 35 builds .

    [...]

    A new Multitasking panel has been added to the configurator (GNOME Control Center) for customizing window and desktop management. In particular, in the Multitasking section, options are provided for disabling the call of the overview mode by touching the upper left corner of the screen, resizing the window when dragging it to the edge of the screen, selecting the number of virtual desktops, showing desktops on additionally connected monitors and switching between applications only for the current one. desktop by pressing the combination Super + Tab.

GNOME 41 Released! New Remote Desktop App, Multitasking & Mobile

  • GNOME 41 Released! New Remote Desktop App, Multitasking & Mobile Network Settings

    After half a year of development, the GNOME project announced version 41 of its popular Linux desktop environment.

    GNOME 41 comes with some exciting new features. The upper right corner system tray menu now includes option to make it easy to switch Power Mode between “Balanced” and “Power Saver”. It’s said that “Performance mode” is only visible on hardware that supports this feature, though I don’t understand which hardware required, may be a dedicated graphics card.

Linux / Unix desktop Gnome 41: performance boost and better...

  • Linux / Unix desktop Gnome 41: performance boost and better settings dialog

    The Gnome project has released version 41 of its Linux / Unix desktop. In addition to a significantly improved settings dialog, it offers an improved calendar application, “Connections” for remote connections to other computers and improvements to the Nautilus file manager. On top of that, the developers promise more oomph through various performance improvements.

    The now updated Gnome is one of the established desktop environments in the open source world. Similar to KDE, Gnome has existed for over two decades and has reinvented itself several times during this time. Today Gnome sets itself apart from most other environments: The Gnome shell as the main element of the desktop, for example, does not imitate the classic look of Windows, but arranges the desktop completely differently. The previous major version of Gnome, 40th, also brought significant visual changes compared to the previous version.

GNOME 41 Overview and Where to Download

  • GNOME 41 Overview and Where to Download

    GNOME 41, the latest stable version of an easy and elegant desktop user interface, just released Wednesday 22 September 2021 six month after the previous version. This article overviews the release with step by step guide for you to download and try it out on computer. Thanks to GNOME, now software freedom is more user friendly and accessible for all computer users!

GNOME 41: Slick with heaps of new features for users and devs

  • GNOME 41: Slick with heaps of new features for users and devs – but annoyances remain

    The GNOME Foundation has released GNOME 41 - six months after GNOME 40, which was the first to be based on the GTK4 toolkit.

    Although GNOME 41 is out, it will take time before the various distros support it and even longer before it turns up as a default desktop environment.

    We used a pre-release of Fedora 35 (full release expected next month) and updated it to the latest available GNOME 41.

    The headline changes begin with an improved power mode, with access from the system status menu and the ability for applications (such as games) to request a particular power mode for full performance.

    The utility for discovering and installing applications, imaginatively called Software, has been redesigned with more categories, revamped information tiles, and bigger screenshots. The team also claimed that "there have been many fixes and improvements under the hood, which make the experience faster and more reliable."

Steven Vaughan-Nichols mentioning GNOME 41 release 6 days late

  • GNOME 41: The next-generation Linux desktop [Ed: Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols is mentioning GNOME 41 release 6 days late]

    If you're just a GNOME user, there's a lot to like about the latest version of this popular Linux desktop interface. But, if you're a GNOME developer, there's more to love in it.

    Firstly, as for the interface itself, it now boasts a new top utility for discovering and installing applications called Software. OK, so the name isn't anything to write home about, but it seems faster, and it's easy enough to use.

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