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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Database containing 106m Thailand travelers' details leaked • The Register

    A database containing personal information on 106 million international travelers to Thailand was exposed to the public internet this year, a Brit biz claimed this week.

    Bob Diachenko, head of cybersecurity research at product-comparison website Comparitech, said the Elasticsearch data store contained visitors' full names, passport numbers, arrival dates, visa types, residency status, and more. It was indexed by search engine Censys on August 20, and spotted by Diachenko two days later. There were no credentials in the database, which is said to have held records dating back a decade.

    “There are many people who would prefer their travel history and residency status not be publicized, so for them there are obvious privacy issues,” wrote Comparitech editor Paul Bischoff on the company’s blog.

  • Break out your emergency change process and patch this ransomware-friendly bug ASAP, says VMware

    VMware has disclosed a critical bug in its flagship vSphere and vCenter products and urged users to drop everything and patch it. The virtualization giant also offered a workaround.

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 185 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 185. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Mattia Rizzolo ]
    * Fix the autopkgtest in order to fix testing migration: the androguard
      Python module is not in the python3-androguard Debian package
    * Ignore a warning in the tests from the h5py package that doesn't concern
      diffoscope.
    
    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Bump Standards-Version to 4.6.0.
    

MoD apologises after Afghan interpreters' data exposed

  • MoD apologises after Afghan interpreters' data exposed • The Register

    The UK's Ministry of Defence has launched an internal investigation after committing the classic CC-instead-of-BCC email error – but with the names and contact details of Afghan interpreters trapped in the Taliban-controlled nation.

    The horrendous data breach took place yesterday, with Defence Secretary Ben Wallace promising an immediate investigation, according to the BBC.

    Included in the breach were profile pictures associated with some email accounts, according to the state-owned broadcaster. The initial email was followed up by a second message urging people who had received the first one to delete it – a way of drawing close attention to an otherwise routine missive.

CISA, FBI, and NSA...

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More in Tux Machines

Stable Kernels: 5.14.13, 5.10.74, 5.4.154, 4.19.212, 4.14.251, 4.9.287, and 4.4.289

I'm announcing the release of the 5.14.13 kernel.

All users of the 5.14 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.14.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.14.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h
Read more Also: Linux 5.10.74 Linux 5.4.154 Linux 4.19.212 Linux 4.14.251 Linux 4.9.287 Linux 4.4.289

Android Leftovers

Review: Auxtral 3

At the beginning of this review I mentioned Auxtral reminded me of Linux Mint Debian Edition. The theme, the Cinnamon desktop, and general look of the project certainly held that first impression. However, the default applications and tools (apart from the Cinnamon desktop and command line utilities) felt quite a bit different. Linux Mint has been around for several years and has earned a reputation for being beginner friendly, polished, and shipping with a lot of top-notch open source applications. Auxtral appears to have a similar approach - similar base distribution, the same desktop environments, and a similar look. However, Auxtral does have its own personality under the surface. It ships with a quite different collection of applications, sometimes using less popular items (Brave in place of Firefox, SMPlayer instead of VLC, etc.) It has also gone its own way with software updates, preferring classic tools like APT and Synaptic over Mint's update manager. Auxtral is off to a good start. This was my first time trying the distribution and the experience was mostly positive. The operating system is easy to install, offers multiple desktop environments, and walks a pretty good line between hand holding and staying out of the way. The application menu is uncluttered while including enough programs to be useful. Some of those programs are a bit more obscure or less beginner friendly than what you might find in Linux Mint, but otherwise it's a good collection. Virtually everything worked and worked smoothly. I was unpleasantly surprised by this distribution's memory usage, most projects consume about half as much RAM, but otherwise I liked what Auxtral had to offer. I might not recommended it to complete beginners, especially since the project does not appear to have any documentation or support options of its own, but for someone who doesn't mind a little command line work or who likes the idea of an easy to setup distribution that combines Debian with the Cinnamon (or Xfce desktop) this seems like a good option. Read more

31 Best Linux Performance Monitoring Tools

Linux Performance Monitoring tools are the tools that allow you to keep track of your Linux system's resources and storage usage, as well as the state of your network. The tools can be used to troubleshoot and debug Linux System Performance issues. In this tutorial, we will learn the best tools for Linux performance monitoring and troubleshooting. Read more