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Building A Custom Linux Single Board Computer Just To Play Spotify

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Housed inside a tidy little wooden enclosure of his own creation, the Spotify Box can turn any amplifier into a remote-controlled Spotify player via Spotify Connect. Pick the songs on your smartphone, and they?ll play from the Spotify Box as simple as that.

The project is based on the Allwinner V3S, a system-on-chip with a 1.2GHz ARM-Cortex-A7 core, 64MB of DDR2 RAM, and an Ethernet transceiver for good measure. There?s also a high-quality audio codec built in, making it perfect for this application. It?s thrown onto a four-layer PCB of [Evan?s] own design, and paired with a Wi-Fi and BlueTooth transceiver, RJ-45 and RCA jacks, a push-button and some LEDs. There?s also an SD card for storage.

With a custom Linux install brewed up using Buildroot, [Evan] was able to get a barebones system running Spotifyd while communicating with the network. With that done, it was as simple as hooking up the Spotify Box to an amp and grooving out to some tunes.

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DIY Spotify Box features custom-designed Allwinner V3s SBC

  • DIY Spotify Box features custom-designed Allwinner V3s SBC

    The Spotify Box is a small DIY device based on an Allwinner V3s single-core Cortex-A7 camera SoC and a wooden enclosure designed to play Spotify songs, and not much else…

    The device serves as a bridge between the official Spotify app and your home audio system connected through the RCA jacks of the box. and allowing you to connect your smartphone to your audio setup and stream music throughout your house.

Spotify Box

  • Spotify Box

    The Spotify Box acts as a middleman between the official Spotify app and a new or existing home audio system – allowing you to connect your smart phone to your audio setup and stream music throughout your house. The basic premise of the device revolves around Spotify’s feature known as Spotify Connect which allows you to use your Spotify app as a remote to control different devices that are on the same Wi-Fi network or associated with your account. The Spotify Box has stereo RCA jacks so you can simply plug it into a preamp, mixer, or amplifier and start playing your tunes. Connecting to a Wi-Fi network is simple enough. Just download the Spotify Box app and give the pushbutton a press to start searching for networks. Then you can choose your Wi-Fi network through my app to get connected. You can also connect over ethernet.

    The origin of the Spotify Box stems from an older project of mine where I created a Bluetooth speaker with a RGB parallel touchscreen interface to display the song, volume, connectivity, etc. In the process of developing this speaker, I stumbled across Spotifyd, an open-source Spotify client that runs as a UNIX daemon. This ultimately sparked the idea to create the Spotify Box. I’ll walk you through the features and process I went through while designing and developing the Spotify Box.

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