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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Fedora Community Blog: Outreachy final blog post

    My internship of 3 months with Fedora has come to an end. From submitting the form 2 times and finally making it the 3’rd time, the journey has been quite challenging. My project “Improve Fedora QA dashboard” motive was to make the dashboard more impactful so that it will be simplified for the newcomers and they can easily understand and contribute without any complexity.

    [...]

    The journey of Outreachy was very great. I learned lots of things, no more a noob now. My mentors were Lukas and Josef. Whenever I got stuck into something they always sought to help me. I didn’t even have the confidence in myself that I would be able to complete the tasks, but eventually, I did. I knew JavaScript, basic ReactJS, and Vanilla Js, however, the project was not about all this, I have implemented the things for the first time like react-i18n, docker, etc, the beginning of the internship was very smooth and easy going but as I came to the second task it was a bit challenging for me as I had to implement the same page twice with two different approaches so that mentors can choose the better one but what matters here was my learning, I feel the more complicating the tasks are, the more you build up yourself while making it easy, learned how to google finally, more about ReactJs and flourished my skills.

  • Leader election in Kubernetes using Apache Camel

    When deploying applications on Kubernetes, certain platform characteristics strongly influence the application's architecture. In a greenfield setting, it's all about harnessing the ephemeral nature of stateless applications. Applications are built to run in scenarios where there is an expectation of high availability via horizontal scaling. Not only can the application scale out, but Kubernetes' orchestration characteristics emphasize that no individual pod is safe from destruction. Kubernetes is the epitome of the old U.S. Navy Seal saying: "Two is one, and one is none."

    Workloads on Kubernetes don't always fit this model, however. Some workloads are singular in nature, and parallelization isn't an option. For example, suppose an application connects out to an external service and receives information asynchronously via a TCP socket or websocket. As part of this process, the application receives data, transforms the structure, and publishes that data into an Apache Kafka topic. In this case, only a single connection can be active at one time because of the possibility of publishing duplicate data (see Figure 1).

  • What is ethical Artificial Intelligence (AI)? 7 questions, answered

    Do you have some anxiety about Artificial Intelligence (AI) bias or related issues? You’re not alone. Nearly all business leaders surveyed for Deloitte’s third State of AI in the Enterprise report expressed concerns around the ethical risks of their AI initiatives.

    There is certainly some cause for uneasiness. Nine out of ten respondents to a late 2020 Capgemini Research Institute survey were aware of at least one instance where an AI system had resulted in ethical issues for their businesses. Nearly two-thirds have experienced the issue of discriminatory bias with AI systems, six out of ten indicated their organizations had attracted legal scrutiny as a result of AI applications, and 22 percent have said they suffered customer backlash because of these decisions reached by AI systems.

    As Capgemini leaders pointed out in their recent blog post: “Enterprises exploring the potential of AI need to ensure they apply AI the right way and for the right purposes. They need to master Ethical AI.”

  • Authenticated Boot and Disk Encryption on Linux

    Linux has been supporting Full Disk Encryption (FDE) and technologies such as UEFI SecureBoot and TPMs for a long time. However, the way they are set up by most distributions is not as secure as they should be, and in some ways quite frankly weird. In fact, right now, your data is probably more secure if stored on current ChromeOS, Android, Windows or MacOS devices, than it is on typical Linux distributions.

    Generic Linux distributions (i.e. Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu, …) adopted Full Disk Encryption (FDE) more than 15 years ago, with the LUKS/cryptsetup infrastructure. It was a big step forward to a more secure environment. Almost ten years ago the big distributions started adding UEFI SecureBoot to their boot process. Support for Trusted Platform Modules (TPMs) has been added to the distributions a long time ago as well — but even though many PCs/laptops these days have TPM chips on-board it's generally not used in the default setup of generic Linux distributions.

    How these technologies currently fit together on generic Linux distributions doesn't really make too much sense to me — and falls short of what they could actually deliver. In this story I'd like to have a closer look at why I think that, and what I propose to do about it.

    [...]

    Many of the mechanisms explained above taken individually do not require UEFI. But of course the chain of trust suggested above requires something like UEFI SecureBoot. If your system lacks UEFI it's probably best to find work-alikes to the technologies suggested above, but I doubt I'll be able to help you there.

  • Lennart: Linux Comes Up Short Around Disk Encryption, Authenticated Boot Security [Ed: All those proprietary software OSes have back doors in their 'encryption' (see e.g. [1, 2]) so quit helping their propaganda]

    Most Linux distributions are currently coming up short from offering adequate security around full disk encryption and authenticated boot. Prominent Linux developer Lennart Poettering even argues that your data is "probably more secure if stored on current ChromeOS, Android, Windows or macOS devices."

    Lead systemd developer Lennart Poettering wrote a lengthy blog post today around the state of authenticated boot and disk encryption on Linux. While many Linux distributions offer full-disk encryption, offer UEFI SecureBoot, and begun embracing TPMs, many of the technologies aren't being used to their best potential yet especially now by default / out-of-the-box.

More in Tux Machines

Pumpkins, markets, and one bad Apple

Imagine your local farmers market: every Saturday the whole town comes together to purchase fresh and homemade goods, enjoy the entertainment, and find that there is always something for everyone. Whatever you need, you can find it here, and anyone can sign up to have their own little stand. It is a wonderful place, or so it seems. Now, imagine starting out as a pumpkin farmer, and you want to sell your pumpkins at this market. The market owner asks 30% of every pumpkin that you sell. It's steep, but the market owner -- we'll call him Mr. Apple -- owns all the markets in your area, so you have little choice. Let's continue this analogy and imagine that, since it is a little hard for you to make ends meet, you decide to tell your customers that they can come visit you at your farm to purchase pumpkins. Mr. Apple overhears and shuts your stand down. You explain that your business cannot be profitable this way, but the grumpy market owner says that you can either comply or find another place. At the end of your rope, you look for information about starting your own farmers market, but it seems Mr. Apple owns every building in town. In the midst of Apple announcing its new products, attention is drawn away from its ongoing battle to maintain its subjugation over users globally. The Netherlands’ Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM) last month informed the U.S. technology giant of its decision that the rules around the in-app payment system are anticompetitive, making it the first antitrust regulator to conclude that the company has abused market power in the App Store. And while Apple is appealing this verdict, the European Union is charging the company with another antitrust claim concerning the App Store. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install PostgreSQL 14 on Ubuntu 20.04 - howtodojo

    In this tutorial, we learn how to install PostgreSQL 14 on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). PostgreSQL, or usually called Postgres, is an open-source object-relational database management system (ORDBMS) with an emphasis on extensibility and standards compliance. PostgreSQL is ACID-compliant and transactional. It is developed by PostgreSQL Global Development Group (PGDG) that consists of many companies and individual contributors. PostgreSQL released under the terms of PostgreSQL license.

  • How to Install Minikube on CentOS 8 - Unixcop

    Minikube is open source software for setting up a single-node Kubernetes cluster on your local machine. The software starts up a virtual machine and runs a Kubernetes cluster inside of it, allowing you to test in a Kubernetes environment locally. Minikube is a tool that runs a single-node Kubernetes cluster in a virtual machine on your laptop. In this tutorial we will show you how to install Minikube on CentOS 8.

  • How to Install and Secure Redis on Ubuntu 20.04 | RoseHosting

    Redis (short for Remote Dictionary Server), is an open-source in-memory data structure store. It’s used as a flexible, highly available key-value database that maintains a high level of performance. It helps to reduce time delays and increase the performance of your application by accessing in microseconds.

  • How to Upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 - OMG! Ubuntu!

    If the glowing reviews for the Ubuntu 21.10 release have you intrigued, here’s how to upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 from an earlier version. Fair warning: this tutorial is super straightforward (the benefits of upgrading after a stable release, rather than a little bit before). Meaning no, you don’t need to be a Linux guru to get going! There are plenty of good reasons to upgrade from Ubuntu 21.04 to Ubuntu 21.10, such as benefiting from a newer Linux kernel, enjoying a new GNOME desktop, sampling the new Yaru Light theme, and getting to go hands-on with an able assortment of updated apps.

  • How to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4 - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at how to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4. Enjoy!

  • Jenkins: How to add a JDK version - Anto ./ Online

    This guide will show you how to add a JDK version to Jenkins. If you plan to run a Java build requiring a specific version of the Java Development Kit, you need to do this.

  • Sending EmailsSend them from Linux Terminal? | Linux Journal

    Does your job require sending a lot of emails on a daily basis? And you often wonder if or how you can send email messages from the Linux terminal. This article explains about 6 different ways of sending emails using the Linux terminal. Let’s go through them.

Development version: GIMP 2.99.8 Released

GIMP 2.99.8 is our new development version, once again coming with a huge set of improvements. Read more Some early coverage:

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released with Clone Tool Tweaks, Support for Windows Ink

    A new development version of GIMP is available to download and it carries some interesting new features. While this isn’t a new stable release — GIMP 2.10.28 is the most recent stable release (and the version you’ll find in Ubuntu 21.10’s archives) — the release of GIMP 2.99.8 is yet another brick in the road to the long-fabled GIMP 3.0 release. And it’s a fairly substantial brick, at that.

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released As Another Step Toward The Long Overdue GIMP 3.0

    GIMP 3.0 as the GTK3 port of this open-source Adobe Photoshop alternative has been talked about for nearly a decade now and the work remains ongoing. However, out today is GIMP 2.99.8 as the newest development snapshot.

Mozilla: Six-Year Moziversary, Thomas Park/Codepip, and Weak Response to Critics of Firefox Spyware

  • Chris H-C: Six-Year Moziversary

    I’ve been working at Mozilla for six years today. Wow. Okay, so what’s happened… I’ve been promoted to Staff Software Engineer. Georg and I’d been working on that before he left, and then, well *gestures at everything*. This means it doesn’t really _feel_ that different to be a Staff instead of a Senior since I’ve been operating at the latter level for over a year now, but the it’s nice that the title caught up. Next stop: well, actually, I think Staff’s a good place for now. Firefox On Glean did indeed take my entire 2020 at work, and did complete on time and on budget. Glean is now available to be used in Firefox Desktop.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Hacks Decoded: Thomas Park, Founder of Codepip

    Thomas Park is a software developer based in the U.S. (Philadelphia, specifically). Previously, he was a teacher and researcher at Drexel University and even worked at Mozilla Foundation for a stint. Now, he’s the founder of Codepip, a platform that offers games that teach players how to code. Park has made a couple games himself: Flexbox Froggy and Grid Garden.

  • Mark Surman: Exploring better data stewardship at Mozilla [Ed: Mozilla fails to admit that spying on Firefox users is wrong; now it's misframing the criticism and responds to a straw man]

    Over the last few years, Mozilla has increasingly turned its attention to the question of ‘how we build more trustworthy AI?’ Data is at the core of this question. Who has our data? What are they using it for? Do they have my interests in mind, or only their own? Do I trust them? We decided earlier this year that ‘better data stewardship’ should be one of the three big areas of focus for our trustworthy AI work. One part of this focus is supporting the growing field of people working on data trusts, data cooperatives and other efforts to build trust and shift power dynamics around data. In partnership with Luminate and Siegel, we launched the Mozilla Data Futures Lab in March as a way to drive this part of the work.